resonate

verb

res·​o·​nate ˈre-zə-ˌnāt How to pronounce resonate (audio)
resonated; resonating

intransitive verb

1
: to produce or exhibit resonance
2
: to respond as if by resonance
resonate to the music
also : to have a repetitive pattern that resembles resonance
3
: to relate harmoniously : strike a chord
a message that resonates with voters

transitive verb

: to subject to resonating

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Resonate vs. Reverberate

Resonate and reverberate each have at least one meaning that is concerned with sound, and they carry a degree of overlap in their definitions. However, there are some subtle differences between them that are worth observing. Resonate typically suggests that a single lasting sound is produced; reverberate, on the other hand, indicates that an initial sound is followed by a series of echoes. In terms of the contexts in which they are used, resonate often involves a person (“that passage of the book resonated with many young readers”); reverberate, on the other hand, is more likely to be used of a thing, such as the aftermath of some major event (“the shock caused by the assassination reverberated across Europe”).

Examples of resonate in a Sentence

The siren resonated throughout the city. the deep sounds of the bassoon resonated through the concert hall
Recent Examples on the Web Use Instagram's sophisticated search and explore features to identify users who resonate with your brand ethos. Tony Pec, Forbes, 13 Feb. 2024 Was there any player that said anything that particularly resonated? Barry Jackson, Miami Herald, 13 Feb. 2024 But when Mahomes got the ball back with 7:22 left, a familiar feeling resonated in the stadium. Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times, 12 Feb. 2024 The vote also showed that Mr. Khan’s strategy of preaching reform and railing against the military has resonated deeply with Pakistanis — particularly young people — who are disillusioned with the political system. Christina Goldbaum, New York Times, 10 Feb. 2024 Fountains of Wayne manages to do something unique and unprecedented with this album, taking a topic as mundane and flat as a simple suburban life, and drawing loads of emotion out of it, which, in our opinion, resonates harder than any average love song or emotional track would. Liza Lentini, SPIN, 9 Feb. 2024 In talking about the series’ endurance and everlasting presence, Gimple attributed that to the fans’ love of the series and the resonating depth of the characters. Diego Ramos Bechara, Variety, 9 Feb. 2024 Your child will relish explaining a complex game to you, and seeing their joy will resonate in your heart. Meghan Leahy, Washington Post, 7 Feb. 2024 Instead of selecting a planner from photos online, venture to Paper Twist in Myers Park to find the one whose pages resonate with you ($12-$35 + sale discount). Jessica Swannie, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'resonate.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1873, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of resonate was in 1873

Dictionary Entries Near resonate

Cite this Entry

“Resonate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/resonate. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

resonate

verb
res·​o·​nate ˈrez-ᵊn-ˌāt How to pronounce resonate (audio)
resonated; resonating
1
: to produce or exhibit resonance
2
a
: to respond as if by resonance
resonate to the music
b
: to strike a chord
a message that resonates with voters

More from Merriam-Webster on resonate

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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