echo

noun (1)
\ ˈe-(ˌ)kō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes also echos

Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : the repetition of a sound caused by reflection of sound waves
b : the sound due to such reflection
2a : a repetition or imitation of another : reflection
c : trace, vestige
d : response
3 : one who closely imitates or repeats another's words, ideas, or acts
4 : a soft repetition of a musical phrase
5a : the repetition of a received radio signal due especially to reflection of part of the wave from an ionized layer of the atmosphere
b(1) : the reflection of transmitted radar signals by an object
(2) : the visual indication of this reflection on a radarscope

echo

verb
echoed; echoing\ ˈe-​(ˌ)kō-​iŋ How to pronounce echo (audio) , ˈe-​kə-​wiŋ \

Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to resound with echoes
2 : to produce an echo

transitive verb

1a : repeat, imitate children echoing their teacher's words
b : to restate in support or agreement his successor echoed his opinion
c : to be reminiscent of : evoke music that echoes an earlier time
2 : to send back (a sound) by the reflection of sound waves

Echo

noun (2)
\ ˈe-(ˌ)kō How to pronounce Echo (audio) \

Definition of Echo (Entry 3 of 4)

: a nymph in Greek mythology who pines away for love of Narcissus until nothing is left of her but her voice

Echo

communications code word

Definition of Echo (Entry 4 of 4)

used as a code word for the letter e

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Other Words from echo

Noun (1)

echoey \ ˈe-​ˌkō-​ē How to pronounce Echo (audio) \ adjective

Examples of echo in a Sentence

Noun (1) We shouted into the canyon and listened to the echo of our voices. the echo of footsteps in the hall His work contains echoes of older and greater poets. The book's title is an echo of a line from an old folk song. The crime is a chilling echo of the murders that shocked the city two years ago. Verb The music echoed through the church. Laughter echoed across the lake. Their voices echoed in the hall. His warnings are echoed by many other experts in the field. “It's in Rome.” “In Rome?” she echoed. Others have echoed her criticisms. The book's title echoes a line from an old folk song. The crime echoes last year's shocking murders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The echo from the National Security Commission Report on AI, only reinforces the time has come to accelerate change and engage all community stakeholders. Cindy Gordon, Forbes, "Building AI Leadership Brain Trust: Sciences Literacy Underpins AI," 5 Apr. 2021 The fjords of Prince Williams Sound echo like thunder as glaciers calve off into the sea at an ever increasing rate. Todd Nelson, Star Tribune, "Record Warmth Today; Followed By PM Severe Threat," 5 Apr. 2021 On Friday, court staffers muted the lines of all but the participants — but one of Shah’s lawyers apparently was connected on both his phone and his computer, creating an echo that rendered the call unintelligible and delayed the proceedings. Scott D. Pierce, The Salt Lake Tribune, "‘Real Housewives of Salt Lake City’ star pleads not guilty to fraud and money laundering," 2 Apr. 2021 Some opponents of student debt forgiveness echo Biden's stance that the proposal benefits those in higher-income brackets. Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "Biden looking into executive authority to cancel student loan debt," 1 Apr. 2021 Closing one eye, Brooks carefully aims, squeezes the trigger, and in an explosion of sound and motion, the bear darts down the mountain and out of view, leaving us to wait for that telltale sign—a low, painful echo of a bruin’s last breath. Ben Romans, Outdoor Life, "Idaho Black Bear Hunting Offers a Close-to-Home Adventure," 9 Mar. 2021 Its popularity may stem partly from its echo of what's happening today in the fight to save democracy and end social injustice. Julie Hinds, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit's '60s counterculture comes alive in novel by longtime activist Peter Werbe," 28 Mar. 2021 The experience feels reverential, an echo of the tombs where the works received offerings meant to animate spirits. BostonGlobe.com, "At the MFA, new galleries bring visitors eye to eye with ancient Egypt," 24 Mar. 2021 And, Martha, this is something that Border Patrol and CBP officials up and down the line echo as well. ABC News, "'This Week' Transcript 3-21-21: Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, Gov. Doug Ducey, Rep. Michael McCaul, Rep. Judy Chu," 21 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And yet such admissions of regret can echo through generations; the parents in his survey who received apologies from their own parents reported being closer with their children. New York Times, "How to Apologize to a Child," 6 Apr. 2021 Servers who echo the speech patterns of their customers receive bigger tips. Melissa Mohr, The Christian Science Monitor, "Conversation starter: Why we mirror speech," 6 Apr. 2021 Robyn Fivush and two Emory colleagues, Robert Thorstad and Matthew Graci, wondered whether our personal narratives might echo these same fictional story arcs. Melissa Fay Greene, The Atlantic, "How Will We Remember the Pandemic?," 6 Apr. 2021 Concrete Cowboy features real-life members of the riding club, who echo these same sentiments. Talia Smith, Harper's BAZAAR, "Concrete Cowboy Is a Fictional Story Based on a Real-Life Battle Against Gentrification," 5 Apr. 2021 For instance, the bright pink chairs in the dining room are replicated with lighter undertones around the kitchen island and in the study, while the grasscloth walls in the main bedroom echo the carpeting in the living room. Nikhita Mahtani, House Beautiful, "How Saturated Color Gave Life to Each Room in This 7,000-Square-Foot Home," 5 Apr. 2021 Although the streets are largely empty of protests, there's long-simmering anger bubbling beneath the surface, and angry calls for justice and reform echo across the city, particularly in the neighborhood where Floyd died. Eric Ferkenhoff, USA TODAY, "Derek Chauvin trial live updates: After an emotional first week for witnesses, testimony resumes Monday," 5 Apr. 2021 The invocations of Floyd’s drug use in Chauvin’s trial also echo previous cases in another way, Futterman said. Mark Berman, Anchorage Daily News, "When police kill people, they are rarely prosecuted and hard to convict," 4 Apr. 2021 The invocations of Floyd’s drug use in Chauvin’s trial also echo previous cases in another way, Futterman said. Mark Berman, Washington Post, "When police kill people, they are rarely prosecuted and hard to convict," 4 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'echo.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of echo

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1596, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun (2)

1595, in the meaning defined above

Communications code word

1952, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for echo

Noun (1)

Middle English ecco, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French echo, from Latin, from Greek ēchō; akin to Latin vagire to wail, Greek ēchē sound

Noun (2)

Greek Ēchō

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Time Traveler for echo

Time Traveler

The first known use of echo was in the 14th century

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Statistics for echo

Last Updated

15 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Echo.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/echo. Accessed 21 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for echo

echo

noun

English Language Learners Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sound that is a copy of another sound and that is produced when sound waves bounce off a surface (such as a wall)
: something (such as a feature or quality) that repeats or resembles something else
: something that is similar to something that happened or existed before

echo

verb

English Language Learners Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

: to be filled with sounds and especially with echoes
: to fill a space, area, etc., with sounds and especially with echoes
: to repeat (what someone else has said or written)

echo

noun
\ ˈe-kō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes

Kids Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the repetition of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves

echo

verb
echoed; echoing

Kids Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to send back or repeat a sound
2 : to repeat another's words

echo

noun
\ ˈek-(ˌ)ō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes also echos

Medical Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the repetition of a sound that is caused by reflection of sound waves
2 : the sound that is due to reflection of sound waves

Other Words from echo

echo verb echoed; echoing\ ˈek-​(ˌ)ō-​iŋ, ˈek-​ə-​wiŋ How to pronounce echo (audio) \

Medical Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

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Comments on echo

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