echo

noun (1)
\ ˈe-(ˌ)kō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes also echos

Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : the repetition of a sound caused by reflection of sound waves
b : the sound due to such reflection
2a : a repetition or imitation of another : reflection
c : trace, vestige
d : response
3 : one who closely imitates or repeats another's words, ideas, or acts
4 : a soft repetition of a musical phrase
5a : the repetition of a received radio signal due especially to reflection of part of the wave from an ionized layer of the atmosphere
b(1) : the reflection of transmitted radar signals by an object
(2) : the visual indication of this reflection on a radarscope

echo

verb
echoed; echoing\ ˈe-​(ˌ)kō-​iŋ How to pronounce echoing (audio) , ˈe-​kə-​wiŋ \

Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to resound with echoes
2 : to produce an echo

transitive verb

1a : repeat, imitate children echoing their teacher's words
b : to restate in support or agreement his successor echoed his opinion
c : to be reminiscent of : evoke music that echoes an earlier time
2 : to send back (a sound) by the reflection of sound waves

Echo

noun (2)
\ ˈe-(ˌ)kō How to pronounce Echo (audio) \

Definition of Echo (Entry 3 of 4)

: a nymph in Greek mythology who pines away for love of Narcissus until nothing is left of her but her voice

Echo

communications code word

Definition of Echo (Entry 4 of 4)

used as a code word for the letter e

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Other Words from echo

Noun (1)

echoey \ ˈe-​ˌkō-​ē How to pronounce echoey (audio) \ adjective

Examples of echo in a Sentence

Noun (1)

We shouted into the canyon and listened to the echo of our voices. the echo of footsteps in the hall His work contains echoes of older and greater poets. The book's title is an echo of a line from an old folk song. The crime is a chilling echo of the murders that shocked the city two years ago.

Verb

The music echoed through the church. Laughter echoed across the lake. Their voices echoed in the hall. His warnings are echoed by many other experts in the field. “It's in Rome.” “In Rome?” she echoed. Others have echoed her criticisms. The book's title echoes a line from an old folk song. The crime echoes last year's shocking murders.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Cypress sound was an explosion of screaming sirens, eerie echoes, and slowed-down funk. Michael Gonzales, Longreads, "It’s Like That: The Makings of a Hip-Hop Writer," 10 June 2019 Its lidar instrument works like radar but with light instead of radio waves: Twin lasers emit 500,000 pulses of light per second and record the echoes, revealing the location and three-dimensional shape of every object beneath the plane. Paul Tullis, New York Times, "To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater," 10 June 2019 Kolob Canyons may be smaller than Zion Canyon, some 40 miles to the south, but this wilderness delivers countless adventures in the form of empty hiking trails and 2,000-foot cliff walls with hardly anyone to hear their own echoes. Joe Yogerst, National Geographic, "Everything to know about Zion National Park," 9 May 2019 Yet these times, for all of their historic echoes, are different. Franklin Foer, The Atlantic, "The Death of the Public Square," 6 July 2018 The last 16 might have been considered par before the groups were drawn, but that too is looking surprisingly doable as the lingering echoes of a certain Scandinavian clap are drowned out amid a chorus of 'Football's Coming Home'. SI.com, "2018 FIFA World Cup Team Preview: Analysing England's Chances at the Tournament," 5 June 2018 His comments on his son's disposition echo what Meghan said about Archie yesterday during the family's photocall at Windsor Castle. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Prince Harry Says His Son Archie "Is So Far Very Quiet"," 9 May 2019 Estes sees echoes of the mortgage mess of 2007, when banks used financial engineering to create and circulate gimmicky debt investments. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "The Sucker at the Token Table: Who Loses in the ICO Bust," 12 May 2018 The calls carry echoes of Ukraine’s policies following mass protests against Russia in 2014 that led to the ouster of the pro-Russian then-President Viktor Yanukovych. Thomas Grove, WSJ, "Belarus in Talks to Boost U.S. Presence," 14 Jan. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The light refracted against the walls seems to thrum, resonant with voices of the water echoing on the cliffs. Christopher Ketcham, Harper's magazine, "Ramblin’ Man," 24 June 2019 Despite the player having previously mentioned his desire to become a legend with the Hoops, personal terms are not expected to be a problem with the Daily Mail echoing the statements that the player is keen on the move south. SI.com, "Arsenal 'Optimistic' Over Kieran Tierney Deal With Revised Bid Expected as Celtic Seek £25m," 23 June 2019 The 70,000-square-foot-building, which echoes nearby Black Rock Desert’s geology, houses a permanent collection of Western and contemporary art. Erin E. Williams, Twin Cities, "Stunning vistas, modern museums, quirky shops make Reno a favorite for tourists," 22 June 2019 Sacramento police Officer Tara O'Sullivan lay on the ground bleeding as gunshots echoed and her colleagues tried to get to her. Madeline Holcombe, CNN, "Shooting suspect watched officers on camera as he fired. He killed a 26-year-old trainee, police say," 22 June 2019 The comment echoed reminders of Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 phones that thrice had to be recalled in 2016 and 2017 because of a similar battery issue; back then, the phones were banned on flights. Edward Baig, USA TODAY, "Apple voluntarily recalling batteries on MacBook Pro notebooks due to safety risk. What to do," 20 June 2019 Plenty of the post’s commenters echoed that sentiment. Christina Oehler, Health.com, "This Woman Can’t Orgasm in Front of Her Partner Because She’s so Embarrassed of How She Looks in Bed," 19 June 2019 Edwards also echoed the reporters’ analysis that found those private schools purport to be better than their public counterparts, but in many cases are not, unbeknownst to participating families. Kim Chatelain, nola.com, "Edwards vows to push for changes to Louisiana voucher program after news investigation reveals flaws," 18 June 2019 Meals Included:Breakfast Accommodations:Dellarosa Hotel and Suites Day 8: Marrakech Wake up as the call to prayer echoes across the city. National Geographic, "Morocco Family Journey: Ancient Souks to the Sahara," 17 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'echo.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of echo

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1596, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun (2)

1595, in the meaning defined above

Communications code word

1952, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for echo

Noun (1)

Middle English ecco, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French echo, from Latin, from Greek ēchō; akin to Latin vagire to wail, Greek ēchē sound

Noun (2)

Greek Ēchō

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Statistics for echo

Last Updated

26 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for echo

The first known use of echo was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for echo

echo

noun

English Language Learners Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a sound that is a copy of another sound and that is produced when sound waves bounce off a surface (such as a wall)
: something (such as a feature or quality) that repeats or resembles something else
: something that is similar to something that happened or existed before

echo

verb

English Language Learners Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

: to be filled with sounds and especially with echoes
: to fill a space, area, etc., with sounds and especially with echoes
: to repeat (what someone else has said or written)

echo

noun
\ ˈe-kō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes

Kids Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the repetition of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves

echo

verb
echoed; echoing

Kids Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to send back or repeat a sound
2 : to repeat another's words

echo

noun
\ ˈek-(ˌ)ō How to pronounce echo (audio) \
plural echoes also echos

Medical Definition of echo

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the repetition of a sound that is caused by reflection of sound waves
2 : the sound that is due to reflection of sound waves

Other Words from echo

echo verb echoed; echoing\ ˈek-​(ˌ)ō-​iŋ, ˈek-​ə-​wiŋ How to pronounce echoing (audio) \

Medical Definition of echo (Entry 2 of 2)

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More from Merriam-Webster on echo

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with echo

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for echo

Spanish Central: Translation of echo

Nglish: Translation of echo for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of echo for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about echo

Comments on echo

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