resonate

verb
res·​o·​nate | \ˈre-zə-ˌnāt \
resonated; resonating

Definition of resonate 

intransitive verb

1 : to produce or exhibit resonance

2 : to respond as if by resonance resonate to the music also : to have a repetitive pattern that resembles resonance

3 : to relate harmoniously : strike a chord a message that resonates with voters

transitive verb

: to subject to resonating

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Synonyms for resonate

Synonyms

echo, reecho, resound, reverberate, sound

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Resonate vs. Reverberate

Resonate and reverberate each have at least one meaning that is concerned with sound, and they carry a degree of overlap in their definitions. However, there are some subtle differences between them that are worth observing. Resonate typically suggests that a single lasting sound is produced; reverberate, on the other hand, indicates that an initial sound is followed by a series of echoes. In terms of the contexts in which they are used, resonate often involves a person (“that passage of the book resonated with many young readers”); reverberate, on the other hand, is more likely to be used of a thing, such as the aftermath of some major event (“the shock caused by the assassination reverberated across Europe”).

Examples of resonate in a Sentence

The siren resonated throughout the city. the deep sounds of the bassoon resonated through the concert hall

Recent Examples on the Web

His campaign is premised on the notion that a military background and the image of a political fresh face will resonate strongly enough in the rest of the state to offset Vukmir’s strength in southeast Wisconsin. Craig Gilbert, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "GOP senate primary in Wisconsin already reflects north-south divide within party," 13 July 2018 From April: Rampant opioid injection: 'A ticking time bomb' that puts nation at risk Against this backdrop, many schools and community groups turn to speakers with real-life experience, hoping their cautionary tales will resonate with kids. Matthew Glowicki, The Courier-Journal, "Do those real-life addiction stories really keep kids off drugs?," 12 July 2018 This suspicion—that people are too eager to relax and enjoy themselves—seems to resonate. Livia Gershon, Longreads, "Clocking Out," 11 July 2018 On that score don’t underestimate how the refusal by a restaurant in Lexington, Virginia, to serve White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will resonate politically. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "How to Re-Elect Trump," 24 June 2018 The policy’s immediate impacts will be difficult for many voters to ascertain, while its symbolism will likely resonate with some Rust Belt residents. Eric Levitz, Daily Intelligencer, "Trump Raises Taxes on Chinese Goods, Eyes Foreign Cars Next," 15 June 2018 But emphasizing the power of love seemed to resonate across countries, races and even political views perhaps because such a unifying message is rarely shared so prominently. Eugene Scott, Washington Post, "Royal wedding sermon on ‘love’ was about more than the marriage of Harry and Meghan," 20 May 2018 The Fringe Factor: The struggles of art vs. commerce and self-doubt vs. self-confidence certainly will resonate with the Fringe set. Matthew J. Palm, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Review: Awake - Fringe 2018," 14 May 2018 The West Midlands team earned congratulations from many former players on social media, but a tweet from Crystal Palace attacker Bakary Sako seemed to resonate with fans, and prompt them to urge him to 'come home'. SI.com, "Wolves Fans Take to Twitter to Urge Former Attacker to Return to Molineux in the Summer," 17 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'resonate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of resonate

1873, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

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Statistics for resonate

Last Updated

6 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for resonate

The first known use of resonate was in 1873

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More Definitions for resonate

resonate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of resonate

: to continue to produce a loud, clear, deep sound for a long time

: to have particular meaning or importance for someone : to affect or appeal to someone in a personal or emotional way

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Comments on resonate

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something that serves to warn or remind

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