reiterate

verb
re·​it·​er·​ate | \ rē-ˈi-tə-ˌrāt How to pronounce reiterate (audio) \
reiterated; reiterating

Definition of reiterate

transitive verb

: to state or do over again or repeatedly sometimes with wearying effect

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Other Words from reiterate

reiteration \ (ˌ)rē-​ˌi-​tə-​ˈrā-​shən How to pronounce reiterate (audio) \ noun
reiterative \ rē-​ˈi-​tə-​ˌrā-​tiv How to pronounce reiterate (audio) , -​t(ə-​)rə-​tiv \ adjective
reiteratively adverb

Did You Know?

Can you guess the meaning of iterate, a less common relative of reiterate? It must mean simply "to state or do," right? Nope. Actually, iterate also means "to state or do again." It's no surprise, then, that some usage commentators have insisted that reiterate must always mean "to say or do again AND AGAIN." No such nice distinction exists in actual usage, however. Both reiterate and iterate can convey the idea of a single repetition or of many repetitions. Reiterate is the older of the two words — it first appeared in the 15th century, whereas iterate turned up around 1533. Both stem from the Latin verb iterare, which is itself from iterum ("again"), but reiterate took an extra step, through Latin reiterare("to repeat").

Examples of reiterate in a Sentence

He iterates and reiterates that his lab likewise provided the French with many biological tools and samples, as well as significant technical guidance … — Natalie Angier, New York Times Book Review, 24 Mar. 1991 Easy victories bring little satisfaction; repeated failures encourage reiterated effort, to the moment of ultimate gratification or ultimate resignation. — Peter Gay, Style in History, 1974 Judge Douglas has again, for, I believe, the fifth time, if not the seventh, in my presence, reiterated his charge of a conspiracy or combination between the National Democrats and Republicans. — Abraham Lincoln, debate versus Stephen A. Douglas, 7 Oct. 1858 "And are you glad to see me?" asked she, reiterating her former question, and pleased to detect the faint dawn of a smile. — Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, 1847 She avoided answering our questions directly, instead reiterating that the answers could be found in her book. Allow me to reiterate: if I am elected, I will not raise taxes.
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Recent Examples on the Web Parler got in trouble for allowing users to spread conspiracy theories, reiterate election misinformation, and make hateful comments. Chris Morris, Fortune, "Far-right social media app Parler is coming back to the App Store after suspension for role in Capitol riots," 19 Apr. 2021 Many reiterate the need to prevent those who first invested in Allston from being pushed out by development and rising rents. BostonGlobe.com, "‘Postcards from Allston’ photographer captures a changing neighborhood and its residents," 16 Apr. 2021 And to reiterate, even drinking a whole glass of Oatly on an empty stomach wouldn’t have nearly as big an effect on your blood sugar as drinking a can of Coke. Christine Byrne, Outside Online, "Is Oat Milk Actually Good for You?," 17 Apr. 2021 House Republicans also plan to reiterate their opposition to a carbon tax. Josh Siegel, Washington Examiner, "Daily on Energy: Kerry struggling to lock down commitments from China and India," 14 Apr. 2021 Powerful Arab Gulf states were quick to reiterate their support for the king, who later fielded a flurry of phone calls from those leaders. Jomana Karadsheh, CNN, "Jordan's royal family drama sends shudders around the region. Here's what we know," 5 Apr. 2021 If anyone has earned the right to reiterate the importance of those lessons to Meredith, it’s Lexie and Mark. Maggie Fremont, Vulture, "Grey’s Anatomy Recap: Grey Sloan Memorial," 2 Apr. 2021 However, many experts reiterate that Covid-19 is far from over. Travis Caldwell, CNN, "Dangerous Covid-19 variants could mean all bets are off on the road to normalcy, expert warns," 26 Mar. 2021 Many of the allegations reiterate those made by Medina and Alvarez in their lawsuits. Emily Alpert Reyes Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "L.A. to pay out $150,000 over lawsuit by former aide to Jose Huizar," 24 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reiterate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reiterate

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for reiterate

Middle English, from Latin reiteratus, past participle of reiterare to repeat, from re- + iterare to iterate

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Time Traveler for reiterate

Time Traveler

The first known use of reiterate was in the 15th century

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Statistics for reiterate

Last Updated

7 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Reiterate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reiterate. Accessed 15 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for reiterate

reiterate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reiterate

somewhat formal : to repeat something you have already said in order to emphasize it

reiterate

verb
re·​it·​er·​ate | \ rē-ˈi-tə-ˌrāt How to pronounce reiterate (audio) \
reiterated; reiterating

Kids Definition of reiterate

: to repeat something said or done I reiterated my warning.

Comments on reiterate

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