redux

adjective re·dux \ (ˌ)rē-ˈdəks , ˈrē-ˌdəks \
Updated on: 15 Nov 2017

Definition of redux

:brought back used postpositively

redux was our Word of the Day on 10/21/2014. Hear the podcast!

Did You Know?

In Latin, redux (from the verb reducere, meaning "to lead back") can mean "brought back" or "bringing back." The Romans used redux as an epithet for the Goddess Fortuna with its "bringing back" meaning; Fortuna Redux was "one who brings another safely home." But it was the "brought back" meaning that made its way into English. Redux belongs to a small class of English adjectives that are always used postpositively-that is, they always follow the words they modify. Redux has a history of showing up in titles of English works, such as John Dryden’s Astraea Redux (a poem "on the happy restoration and return of his sacred majesty, Charles the Second"), Anthony Trollope’s Phineas Redux, and John Updike’s Rabbit Redux.

Origin and Etymology of redux

Latin, returning, from reducere to lead back


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