recourse

noun
re·​course | \ ˈrē-ˌkȯrs How to pronounce recourse (audio) , ri-ˈkȯrs \

Definition of recourse

1a : a turning to someone or something for help or protection settled the matter without recourse to law
b : a source of help or strength : resort had no recourse left
2 : the right to demand payment from the maker or endorser of a negotiable instrument (such as a check)

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Synonyms for recourse

Synonyms

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Examples of recourse in a Sentence

The dispute was settled without recourse to law. a toddler quickly learns that a tantrum is a surefire recourse when a polite request for something is met with parental indifference
Recent Examples on the Web Both Cooper’s office and the Democratic members of the General Assembly voiced their outrage, but as with the Senate’s rejection of Delli-Gatti’s nomination this week, there was ultimately little recourse by way of the courts. Nick Martin, The New Republic, 7 June 2021 The services aren’t regulated or insured, so if a platform fails there is no recourse. Paul Vigna, WSJ, 3 June 2021 The political obstacles for now mean there is perhaps no recourse for the approximately 3.6 million Americans nationwide who stand to see their checks slashed this summer, according to a Washington Post analysis of recent claims data. Tony Romm, Eli Rosenberg, Anchorage Daily News, 21 May 2021 The political obstacles for now mean there is perhaps no recourse for the approximately 3.5 million Americans nationwide who stand to see their checks slashed this summer, according to a Washington Post analysis of recent claims data. BostonGlobe.com, 20 May 2021 Those small kindnesses were given in exchange for women staying in a kind of straightjacket of femininity—female pleasure was unmentionable, queerness was forbidden, and there was almost no recourse for rape and harassment. Jenny Singer, Glamour, 3 May 2021 So far, there’s been little recourse for blue states to challenge this aspect of tax reform. Liz Farmer, Forbes, 21 Apr. 2021 For decades, justice has remained elusive, and revenge has been the most common recourse. Washington Post, 20 Apr. 2021 In some of those cases, the courts can again be a recourse. Matthew Sedacca, New York Times, 14 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recourse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recourse

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for recourse

Middle English recours, from Anglo-French recurs, from Late Latin recursus, from Latin, act of running back, from recurrere to run back — more at recur

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Time Traveler for recourse

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The first known use of recourse was in the 14th century

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Statistics for recourse

Last Updated

13 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Recourse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recourse. Accessed 19 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for recourse

recourse

noun

English Language Learners Definition of recourse

: an opportunity or choice to use or do something in order to deal with a problem or situation

recourse

noun
re·​course | \ ˈrē-ˌkȯrs How to pronounce recourse (audio) \

Kids Definition of recourse

: someone or something that can be turned to for help or protection

recourse

noun
re·​course | \ ˈrē-ˌkōrs, ri-ˈkōrs How to pronounce recourse (audio) \

Legal Definition of recourse

1a : the act of turning to someone or something for assistance especially in obtaining redress
b : a means to a desired end especially in the nature of a remedy or justice also : the end itself
2 : the right or ability to demand payment or compensation specifically : the right to demand payment from the endorser or drawer of a negotiable instrument — see also recourse note at note — compare non-recourse

Note: Under Article 3 of the Uniform Commercial Code, the phrase without recourse on a negotiable instrument limits the liability of the endorser or drawer. If an endorsement states that it is made without recourse, the endorser is not liable to pay, subject to various conditions, if the instrument is dishonored. Similarly, if a draft states that it is drawn without recourse, the drawer is not liable to pay, subject to various conditions, if the draft is dishonored, provided that it is not a check.

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