rebuke

verb
re·​buke | \ ri-ˈbyük How to pronounce rebuke (audio) \
rebuked; rebuking

Definition of rebuke

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to criticize sharply : reprimand
b : to serve as a rebuke to
2 archaic : to turn back or keep down : check

rebuke

noun

Definition of rebuke (Entry 2 of 2)

: an expression of strong disapproval : reprimand

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Other Words from rebuke

Verb

rebuker noun

Choose the Right Synonym for rebuke

Verb

reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide mean to criticize adversely. reprove implies an often kindly intent to correct a fault. gently reproved my table manners rebuke suggests a sharp or stern reproof. the papal letter rebuked dissenting clerics reprimand implies a severe, formal, often public or official rebuke. reprimanded by the ethics committee admonish suggests earnest or friendly warning and counsel. admonished by my parents to control expenses reproach and chide suggest displeasure or disappointment expressed in mild reproof or scolding. reproached him for tardiness chided by their mother for untidiness

Examples of rebuke in a Sentence

Verb

the father was forced to rebuke his son for the spendthrift ways he had adopted since arriving at college strongly rebuked the girl for playing with matches

Noun

delivered a stinging rebuke to the Congress, calling for an end to backstabbing and arguing
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Five months prior to her April 2003 retirement, then-Deputy Attorney General Larry Thompson sent a memo to Sawyer rebuking the bureau for keeping white collar criminals out of federal prisons. CBS News, "Attorney general reassigns director of federal Bureau of Prisons after Jeffrey Epstein suicide," 19 Aug. 2019 That move came before a Senate Appropriations panel debate Thursday, when lawmakers from both parties were set to rebuke the administration. CBS News, "Trump administration releases $250 million in Ukraine military aid," 12 Sep. 2019 Leaders both male and female took to Twitter to respond to the list, many harshly rebuking Forbes for publishing it. NBC News, "Stephanie Ruhle: The shame of Forbes' sexist innovators list," 10 Sep. 2019 Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib went to the Minnesota Capitol Monday to rebuke Israel’s treatment of Palestinians and travel restrictions that kept the first two Muslim women in Congress from visiting Israel, a key U.S. ally in the Middle East. Christopher Magan, Twin Cities, "Ilhan Omar: Go to Israel, see ‘cruel reality of the occupation’," 19 Aug. 2019 After Collins and other Republicans objected, the House voted to override the parliamentarian’s decision on Pelosi’s remarks, allowing them to finally move forward with a vote to rebuke the president. Heather Timmons, Quartz, "How a manual written by Thomas Jefferson sparked a battle over Trump and racism," 17 July 2019 North Carolina Democrats and voting rights advocates are weighing last-minute challenges to the state's congressional voting maps after a three-judge panel rebuked extreme partisan gerrymandering in the state. Jane C. Timm, NBC News, "Democrats eye move against GOP congressional gerrymandering in North Carolina," 4 Sep. 2019 As a disciplined force, the police are not allowed to comment on public policies, let alone rebuke their superior. The Economist, "Protesters are fighting for an open society," 20 Aug. 2019 One glimpse came in February, when Trump publicly rebuked Lighthizer during an Oval Office meeting with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He. Damian Paletta, Washington Post, "Trump is increasingly relying on himself — not his aides — in trade war with China," 6 Aug. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

After Marechera returned to independent Zimbabwe, he was harassed and persecuted by state security for his refusal to join the system, or his public rebukes directed towards the status quo. Tinashe Mushakavanhu, Quartz Africa, "The Zimbabwean writer who was Robert Mugabe’s nemesis," 7 Sep. 2019 The administration is expected to present a plan soon to cut as much as $4 billion in economic and development aid, drawing wide bipartisan rebukes from Capitol Hill. Matthew Lee, The Denver Post, "Trump wields sanctions hammer; experts wonder to what end," 18 Aug. 2019 The administration is expected to present a plan soon to cut as much as $4 billion in economic and development aid, drawing wide bipartisan rebukes from Capitol Hill. Matthew Lee, BostonGlobe.com, "As Trump pursues aggressive economic sanctions, many wonder where this strategy will lead," 18 Aug. 2019 Video of the assault went viral and drew rebukes from liberal and conservative politicians across the United States. oregonlive.com, "Andy Ngo says he suffered brain injury during Portland ‘mob beating’," 25 July 2019 Over the years, the incendiary language, litigiousness, and other brash tactics have earned him rebukes from judges, exile from environmental groups, and time behind bars. BostonGlobe.com, "The ‘Prince of Whales’ wages a relentless and abrasive fight to save a species," 15 Sep. 2019 Tucked into this sweeping report is at least one wholly firm rebuke of a notorious games industry practice: the loot box. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "UK Parliament: Ban all loot boxes until evidence proves they’re safe for kids," 12 Sep. 2019 Kathy Ware, a nurse who also cares for her 21-year-old son Kylen who has multiple disabilities, provided an emotional rebuke of the legislation. Christopher Magan, Twin Cities, "Should Minnesota allow assisted suicide for the terminally ill? Proposal underway could make it legal.," 11 Sep. 2019 The report is the second in as many years to criticize Comey’s actions as FBI director, following a separate inspector general rebuke for decisions made during the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server. Eric Tucker, The Denver Post, "Former FBI Director James Comey violated FBI policies in handling of memos, DOJ watchdog says," 29 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rebuke.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rebuke

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rebuke

Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French rebucher, rebouker to blunt, check, reprimand

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Dictionary Entries near rebuke

rebuild

rebuilder

rebukable

rebuke

rebukeful

rebukingly

reburial

Statistics for rebuke

Last Updated

9 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for rebuke

The first known use of rebuke was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for rebuke

rebuke

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rebuke

formal : to speak in an angry and critical way to (someone)

rebuke

verb
re·​buke | \ ri-ˈbyük How to pronounce rebuke (audio) \
rebuked; rebuking

Kids Definition of rebuke

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to criticize severely She was rebuked for being late.

rebuke

noun

Kids Definition of rebuke (Entry 2 of 2)

: an expression of strong disapproval

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More from Merriam-Webster on rebuke

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rebuke

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rebuke

Spanish Central: Translation of rebuke

Nglish: Translation of rebuke for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rebuke for Arabic Speakers

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