prow

adjective
\ ˈprau̇ How to pronounce prow (audio) \

Definition of prow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

archaic

prow

noun
\ ˈprau̇ How to pronounce prow (audio) , archaic ˈprō \

Definition of prow (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the bow of a ship : stem
2 : a pointed projecting front part

Examples of prow in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Its ornate pedestal, in the form of a ship’s prow, contains a colorful diorama of the view voyagers to New York would enjoy once the statue was installed. New York Times, 19 June 2021 This June brings new books that are sweeter than drinking a cocktail on the prow of a speedboat under a cloudless sky. Jenny Singer, Glamour, 4 June 2021 Long thought to have been the prow of the Tyger, it is now ascribed to a somewhat later era. John Mcphee, The New Yorker, 12 Apr. 2021 From prow to stern, the baby boat measures in at just 30 microns, which is about one-third of the thickness of a strand of human hair. Courtney Linder, Popular Mechanics, 29 Oct. 2020 That move brings up the view from the forward-looking camera, showing the scene immediately ahead of the S.S. Yukon's towering prow. Ezra Dyer, Car and Driver, 24 Sep. 2020 Half his performance is in his bearing, chin jutted forward like the prow of a swollen yacht. James Poniewozik, New York Times, 24 Sep. 2020 The architect gave it a prow-like wall of windows that juts toward the lake, common in post and beam. Judy Rose, Detroit Free Press, 8 Aug. 2020 The Cape is a massive prow, a knobby 1,300-foot-high headland that plunges directly to the sea from the southernmost flank of Isla Hornos. Craig Welch, National Geographic, 7 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prow

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1555, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for prow

Adjective

Middle English, from Anglo-French pru, prou — more at proud

Noun

Middle French proue, probably from Old Italian dialect prua, from Latin prora, from Greek prōira

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Time Traveler for prow

Time Traveler

The first known use of prow was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near prow

provostship

prow

prowess

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Cite this Entry

“Prow.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prow. Accessed 29 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for prow

prow

noun

English Language Learners Definition of prow

: the front of a ship

prow

noun
\ ˈprau̇ How to pronounce prow (audio) \

Kids Definition of prow

: the bow of a ship

More from Merriam-Webster on prow

Nglish: Translation of prow for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of prow for Arabic Speakers

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