promulgate

verb
pro·​mul·​gate | \ ˈprä-məl-ˌgāt How to pronounce promulgate (audio) ; prō-ˈməl-, prə-ˈməl-, ˈprō-(ˌ)məl- How to pronounce promulgate (audio) \
promulgated; promulgating

Definition of promulgate

transitive verb

1 : to make (an idea, belief, etc.) known to many people by open declaration : proclaim … the huge meeting served primarily as the occasion on which to promulgate the official doctrine …— Roger Shattuck From the beginning our objective has been to develop and promulgate new models for the calculus-based introductory course.— John S. Rigden et al.
2a : to make known or public the terms of (a proposed law) The law was promulgated in February 1993.
b : to put (a law or rule) into action or force … more than 200 colleges and universities have promulgated behavioral codes that punish various forms of harassment …— Ken Myers

Other Words from promulgate

promulgation \ ˌprä-​məl-​ˈgā-​shən How to pronounce promulgate (audio) ; ˌprō-​(ˌ)məl-​ , (ˌ)prō-​ˌməl-​ \ noun
promulgator \ ˈprä-​məl-​ˌgā-​tər How to pronounce promulgate (audio) ; prō-​ˈməl-​ , prə-​ˈməl-​ , ˈprō-​(ˌ)məl-​ \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for promulgate

declare, announce, proclaim, promulgate mean to make known publicly. declare implies explicitness and usually formality in making known. the referee declared the contest a draw announce implies the declaration of something for the first time. announced their engagement at a party proclaim implies declaring clearly, forcefully, and authoritatively. the president proclaimed a national day of mourning promulgate implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law. promulgated an edict of religious toleration

Did you know?

The origin of promulgate is a bit murky, or perhaps we should say "milky." It comes from Latin promulgatus, which in turn derives from pro-, meaning "forward," and -mulgare, a form that is probably related to the verb mulgēre, meaning "to milk" or "to extract." Mulgēre is an ancestor of the English word emulsion ("mixture of mutually insoluble liquids"), and it is also related to the Old English word that became milk itself. Like its synonyms declare, announce, and proclaim, promulgate means "to make known publicly." It particularly implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law.

Examples of promulgate in a Sentence

Her ideas have been widely promulgated on the Internet. The law was promulgated in April 1988.
Recent Examples on the Web Some conservatives on the court, such as Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, have long opposed allowing federal agencies to promulgate regulations without specific authority from Congress. John Fritze, USA TODAY, 8 Jan. 2022 In 1616, six years after first announcing his astronomical discoveries, Galileo swore an oath before a Vatican official, agreeing not to promulgate the Copernican model. Andrew Crumey, WSJ, 8 Oct. 2021 In 2000, over dinner at the Cosmos Club in Washington, Mr. Paller convened a group of cybersecurity luminaries who discussed the need to promulgate best practices. Washington Post, 29 Nov. 2021 The Haredim, in his view, promulgate a narrow version of Judaism that divides the country rather than unites it, and threatens the secular vision of the state’s founders. New York Times, 25 Oct. 2021 Frost did not rule out the possibility that the DNR could promulgate a permanent rule and hold a season, perhaps even before Feb. 28, the last allowable date by statute. Paul A. Smith, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 22 Oct. 2021 But that by itself was not enough to promulgate the result through the field. Quanta Magazine, 9 Sep. 2021 When coronavirus restrictions put a hold on all protests, Beijing moved to promulgate a national security law in June 2020 that criminalized secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. Jessie Yeung, CNN, 15 Aug. 2021 The protests, which often turned violent and threw the semi-autonomous Chinese city into political turmoil, prompted the Chinese government to promulgate the security law last summer. Jessie Yeung, CNN, 23 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'promulgate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of promulgate

1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for promulgate

Latin promulgatus, past participle of promulgare, from pro- forward + -mulgare (probably akin to mulgēre to milk, extract) — more at emulsion

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Time Traveler for promulgate

Time Traveler

The first known use of promulgate was in 1530

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Dictionary Entries Near promulgate

prompture

promulgate

promulge

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Last Updated

26 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Promulgate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/promulgate. Accessed 29 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for promulgate

promulgate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of promulgate

: to make (an idea, belief, etc.) known to many people
: to make (a new law) known officially and publicly

promulgate

transitive verb
prom·​ul·​gate | \ ˈprä-məl-ˌgāt, prō-ˈməl- How to pronounce promulgate (audio) \
promulgated; promulgating

Legal Definition of promulgate

1 : to make known or public
2 : to put (as a regulation) into effect

Other Words from promulgate

promulgation \ ˌprä-​məl-​ˈgā-​shən, ˌprō-​ˌməl-​ How to pronounce promulgate (audio) \ noun
promulgator \ ˈprä-​məl-​ˌgā-​tər, prō-​ˈməl-​ How to pronounce promulgate (audio) \ noun

More from Merriam-Webster on promulgate

Nglish: Translation of promulgate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of promulgate for Arabic Speakers

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