proclivity

noun
pro·​cliv·​i·​ty | \ prō-ˈkli-və-tē \
plural proclivities

Definition of proclivity

: an inclination or predisposition toward something especially : a strong inherent inclination toward something objectionable

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Choose the Right Synonym for proclivity

leaning, propensity, proclivity, penchant mean a strong instinct or liking for something. leaning suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable. a student with artistic leanings propensity implies a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination. a propensity to offer advice proclivity suggests a strong natural proneness usually to something objectionable or evil. a proclivity for violence penchant implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object. a penchant for taking risks

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Have you always had this leaning toward wanting to know about words and their etymologies? Maybe you even have a propensity to use the featured word several times in the course of the day—due, of course, not to a proclivity for pretentiousness, but because you simply have a penchant for using a rich vocabulary. And perhaps you have a predilection for using lots of synonyms, such as proclivity (from clivus, the Latin word for "slope"), referring to a tendency usually toward something bad; propensity, suggesting an often uncontrollable inclination; penchant, meaning an irresistible attraction; and predilection, which describes a strong liking derived from one's temperament.

Examples of proclivity in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

While people of course have different aesthetic proclivities, there are some things that are just pleasing to all of us. Noor Brara, Vogue, "Samin Nosrat Wants Viewers to Cook What They See on Her New Netflix Show, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat," 19 Oct. 2018 His locs are perpetually crisp and manicured, sometimes twisted together — another obvious aesthetic proclivity. Sharine Taylor, Allure, "For These Dancehall Artists, Hair Is Just as Important as the Music," 27 Sep. 2018 Polster has historically shown a proclivity to resolve cases and avoid trials. Eric Heisig, cleveland.com, "Judge trying to settle opioid lawsuits says trials may be possible to overcome hurdles in talks," 11 July 2017 Meanwhile, Cuarón and his older brother Carlos — with whom he co-wrote the screenplay — take advantage of their scoundrel antihero’s job and proclivities to riff on TV commercials, and to document yuppie life in early 1990s Mexico. Noel Murray, The Verge, "The first film by Roma director Alfonso Cuarón is streaming on Netflix," 23 Nov. 2018 Sokolsky, a Wolf discovery, had a proclivity for the fantastical; in his images, models tumbled off giant chairs and glided through the air like seraphs. Stephen Mooallem, Harper's BAZAAR, "Pop Goes Bazaar: A Look Back at the Magazine in the 1960s," 9 June 2017 Well, that could be just about anyone given Dipoto’s proclivity for transaction and his creativity in coming up with possibilities. Ryan Divish, The Seattle Times, "Analysis: What does Mariners GM Jerry Dipoto mean about a ‘step back’ in 2019?," 21 Nov. 2018 Musk's proclivity for Twitter and his inability to not shoot himself in the foot are also eerily reminisicent of Hughes' destructive outbursts of temper and lack of a filter. Chris Ciaccia, Fox News, "Elon Musk and Howard Hughes eccentric, Hollywood-loving entrepreneurs who share much in common," 7 Sep. 2018 That seems eternally ago because England long since took both its proclivity and reputation for disorder and snuffed out both - systematically, decisively and impressively. Chuck Culpepper, chicagotribune.com, "World Cup final will include one of these teams: England, Croatia, Sweden, Russia. Really.," 4 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proclivity.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of proclivity

1561, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for proclivity

Latin proclivitas, from proclivis sloping, prone, from pro- forward + clivus slope — more at pro-, declivity

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Dictionary Entries near proclivity

proclisis

proclitic

proclive

proclivity

Proclus

Procne

procnemial

Statistics for proclivity

Last Updated

25 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for proclivity

The first known use of proclivity was in 1561

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More Definitions for proclivity

proclivity

noun

English Language Learners Definition of proclivity

formal : a strong natural liking for something that is usually bad : a tendency to do something that is usually bad

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