penchant

play
noun pen·chant \ ˈpen-chənt , especially British ˈpäⁿ-ˌshäⁿ \

Definition of penchant

:a strong and continued inclination; broadly :liking

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Examples of penchant in a Sentence

  1. Aside from the Catholic penchant for fish on Fridays, there is also the tradition of eating red beans and rice on Monday … —Tom PiazzaWhy New Orleans Matters2005
  2. Whether manifested in feminine decor or in an approach to teaching that assumes a female penchant for cooperative, or "connected," learning, stereotypical notions of femininity often infect institutions for women and girls. —Wendy KaminerAtlanticApril 1998
  3. From both her father and mother she had inherited a penchant for art, literature, philosophy, and music. Already at eighteen she was dreaming of painting, singing, writing poetry, writing books, acting—anything and everything. —Theodore DreiserThe Titan1914
  4. a penchant for sitting by the window and staring moodily off into space

Recent Examples of penchant from the Web

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'penchant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

What is the Difference Between penchant, leaning, propensity, And proclivity?

Like its synonyms "leaning," "propensity," and "proclivity," "penchant" implies a strong instinct or liking for something. But these four words, while similar, are also distinguished by subtle differences. "Leaning" usually suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable ("a student with artistic leanings"), whereas "propensity" tends to imply a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination ("a propensity to offer advice"). "Proclivity" frequently suggests a strong, natural proneness to something objectionable or evil ("a proclivity for violence"). "Penchant," a descendant of Latin pendere ("to weigh"), typically implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object ("a penchant for taking risks").

Origin and Etymology of penchant

French, from present participle of pencher to incline, from Vulgar Latin *pendicare, from Latin pendere to weigh

Synonym Discussion of penchant

leaning, propensity, proclivity, penchant mean a strong instinct or liking for something. leaning suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable.
    • a student with artistic leanings
propensity implies a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination.
    • a propensity to offer advice
proclivity suggests a strong natural proneness usually to something objectionable or evil.
    • a proclivity for violence
penchant implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object.
    • a penchant for taking risks

PENCHANT Defined for English Language Learners

penchant

play
noun

Definition of penchant for English Language Learners

  • : a strong liking for something or a strong tendency to behave in a certain way



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