penchant

noun
pen·​chant | \ ˈpen-chənt, especially British ˈpäⁿ-ˌshäⁿ\

Definition of penchant

: a strong and continued inclination broadly : liking

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Choose the Right Synonym for penchant

leaning, propensity, proclivity, penchant mean a strong instinct or liking for something. leaning suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable. a student with artistic leanings propensity implies a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination. a propensity to offer advice proclivity suggests a strong natural proneness usually to something objectionable or evil. a proclivity for violence penchant implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object. a penchant for taking risks

What is the Difference Between penchant, leaning, propensity, And proclivity?

Like its synonyms "leaning," "propensity," and "proclivity," "penchant" implies a strong instinct or liking for something. But these four words, while similar, are also distinguished by subtle differences. "Leaning" usually suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable ("a student with artistic leanings"), whereas "propensity" tends to imply a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination ("a propensity to offer advice"). "Proclivity" frequently suggests a strong, natural proneness to something objectionable or evil ("a proclivity for violence"). "Penchant," a descendant of Latin pendere ("to weigh"), typically implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object ("a penchant for taking risks").

Examples of penchant in a Sentence

Aside from the Catholic penchant for fish on Fridays, there is also the tradition of eating red beans and rice on Monday … — Tom Piazza, Why New Orleans Matters, 2005 Whether manifested in feminine decor or in an approach to teaching that assumes a female penchant for cooperative, or "connected," learning, stereotypical notions of femininity often infect institutions for women and girls. — Wendy Kaminer, Atlantic, April 1998 From both her father and mother she had inherited a penchant for art, literature, philosophy, and music. Already at eighteen she was dreaming of painting, singing, writing poetry, writing books, acting—anything and everything. — Theodore Dreiser, The Titan, 1914 a penchant for sitting by the window and staring moodily off into space
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Recent Examples on the Web

What’s less enjoyable is the film’s indifference to detail, and its penchant for formula. Joe Morgenstern, WSJ, "‘The Mule’ Review: From Horticulture to Drug Culture," 13 Dec. 2018 First came 2017’s A Christmas Prince and its penchant for bad journalism and Converse shoes paired with ball gowns. Kelsea Stahler, Teen Vogue, "Netflix Original Christmas Movies: A Guide to the Cheesy Holiday Flicks," 11 Dec. 2018 His penchant for squirrel meat seems to have inadvertently exposed him to an incredibly rare fatal brain disorder, the first time this disorder was ever contracted in the United States. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "A Man Contracted a Rare, Fatal Disease From Eating Squirrel Brains," 17 Oct. 2018 During the more the 11 hours of questioning, Cruz made statements to Broward County detective about recent issues he was faced with, including the death of his parents and his penchant for killing animals. Benjamin Brown, Fox News, "Florida school shooting suspect shouted 'kill me' hours after taken into custody," 7 Aug. 2018 Knowing Wawa, and its penchant for territorial domination, this looks more like a coordinated strategy than a simple coincidence. Inga Saffron, Philly.com, "Let's not welcome a Wawa on Philadelphia's Delaware waterfront | Inga Saffron," 4 July 2018 Grant is intriguingly cast as Thorpe, portraying the politician’s general geniality and charisma as well as his penchant for risk-taking and his sense of entitlement. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "Sex, Lies, and Bunnies in A Very English Scandal," 3 July 2018 But, there's a fresh sense of looseness, lots of play and pockets of weird humor, like Scott's buddy/business partner Luis (Michael Pena) and his penchant for epic yarns. Author: Katie Walsh, Anchorage Daily News, "Review: Playfulness makes ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ sing, not sting," 3 July 2018 Unlike the Victorians and their penchant for interior decorating, Holck and Rasmussen don’t believe the pigment found in their volumes was used for aesthetic purposes. Meilan Solly, Smithsonian, "Arsenic-Laced Books Discovered in University Library," 3 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'penchant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of penchant

1672, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for penchant

French, from present participle of pencher to incline, from Vulgar Latin *pendicare, from Latin pendere to weigh

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Dictionary Entries near penchant

Pence

pencel

penceless

penchant

penché

pencil

pencil and pearl

Statistics for penchant

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for penchant

The first known use of penchant was in 1672

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More Definitions for penchant

penchant

noun

English Language Learners Definition of penchant

: a strong liking for something or a strong tendency to behave in a certain way

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More from Merriam-Webster on penchant

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with penchant

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for penchant

Spanish Central: Translation of penchant

Nglish: Translation of penchant for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of penchant for Arabic Speakers

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