penchant

noun
pen·​chant | \ ˈpen-chənt How to pronounce penchant (audio) , especially British ˈpäⁿ-ˌshäⁿ \

Definition of penchant

: a strong and continued inclination broadly : liking

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Choose the Right Synonym for penchant

leaning, propensity, proclivity, penchant mean a strong instinct or liking for something. leaning suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable. a student with artistic leanings propensity implies a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination. a propensity to offer advice proclivity suggests a strong natural proneness usually to something objectionable or evil. a proclivity for violence penchant implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object. a penchant for taking risks

What is the Difference Between penchant, leaning, propensity, And proclivity?

Like its synonyms "leaning," "propensity," and "proclivity," "penchant" implies a strong instinct or liking for something. But these four words, while similar, are also distinguished by subtle differences. "Leaning" usually suggests a liking or attraction not strong enough to be decisive or uncontrollable ("a student with artistic leanings"), whereas "propensity" tends to imply a deeply ingrained and usually irresistible inclination ("a propensity to offer advice"). "Proclivity" frequently suggests a strong, natural proneness to something objectionable or evil ("a proclivity for violence"). "Penchant," a descendant of Latin pendere ("to weigh"), typically implies a strongly marked taste in the person or an irresistible attraction in the object ("a penchant for taking risks").

Examples of penchant in a Sentence

Aside from the Catholic penchant for fish on Fridays, there is also the tradition of eating red beans and rice on Monday … — Tom Piazza, Why New Orleans Matters, 2005 Whether manifested in feminine decor or in an approach to teaching that assumes a female penchant for cooperative, or "connected," learning, stereotypical notions of femininity often infect institutions for women and girls. — Wendy Kaminer, Atlantic, April 1998 From both her father and mother she had inherited a penchant for art, literature, philosophy, and music. Already at eighteen she was dreaming of painting, singing, writing poetry, writing books, acting—anything and everything. — Theodore Dreiser, The Titan, 1914 a penchant for sitting by the window and staring moodily off into space
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Recent Examples on the Web Naoko still has a penchant for keeping famous winemaking consultants on the payroll — Andy Erickson, a former winemaker at Screaming Eagle, and Michel Rolland, who advises more than 150 wineries around the world. Esther Mobley, San Francisco Chronicle, 12 June 2021 Does the father figure in your life have a penchant for pungent pot? Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times, 12 June 2021 An actor himself, Reagan certainly had a penchant for doing voices, even with such a distinct one of his own that Little also nailed. Ben Flanagan | Bflanagan@al.com, al, 30 May 2021 Her penchant for excess extends well beyond the confines of her bedroom. Seija Rankin, EW.com, 29 Apr. 2021 Between the dad’s penchant for stripping down to boxer shorts when relaxing at home, the mom’s general wackiness, and the seminarian who stays with the family before his ordination, Lockwood has lots of comic material to work with. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 4 Jan. 2021 President Trump’s penchant for spouting off about ongoing Justice Department investigations and prosecutions. The Editors, National Review, 15 Dec. 2020 His penchant for a bright color palette, symmetry and nostalgia, as seen in The Royal Tenenbaums, The Grand Budapest Hotel and Moonrise Kingdom, has earned him legions of fans. Jennifer Nalewicki, Smithsonian Magazine, 25 Nov. 2020 Ellis was a beacon of the New York art and entertainment world, known for his convivial air, penchant for playful fibbing, and teeming black book. Jordan Coley, The New Yorker, 23 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'penchant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of penchant

1672, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for penchant

French, from present participle of pencher to incline, from Vulgar Latin *pendicare, from Latin pendere to weigh

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Time Traveler for penchant

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The first known use of penchant was in 1672

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Last Updated

22 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Penchant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/penchant. Accessed 22 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for penchant

penchant

noun

English Language Learners Definition of penchant

: a strong liking for something or a strong tendency to behave in a certain way

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