potable

adjective
po·​ta·​ble | \ ˈpō-tə-bəl How to pronounce potable (audio) , military often ˈpä- \

Definition of potable

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: suitable for drinking

potable

noun

Definition of potable (Entry 2 of 2)

: a liquid that is suitable for drinking especially : an alcoholic beverage

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Other Words from potable

Adjective

potability \ ˌpō-​tə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē How to pronounce potable (audio) \ noun
potableness \ ˈpō-​tə-​bəl-​nəs How to pronounce potable (audio) , military often  ˈpä-​ \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for potable

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Noun

  • nonintoxicant
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Examples of potable in a Sentence

Adjective around here, the only potable water comes from wells Noun hid the potables in the back hall closet keeps the wet bar stocked with an array of top-shelf liquors, mixers, and other fine potables
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective City spokeswoman Michelle Atoa said the city provided over 26,500 bottles of water and around 7,000 gallons of non-potable water. Sarah Haselhorst, USA TODAY, 9 Mar. 2021 Seven distribution sites for non-potable water remain open across the city, and the city is also delivering bottled water to elderly and homebound residents. Justin Vicory, USA TODAY, 3 Mar. 2021 Residents have been lining up at several sites that distribute non-potable water or water for flushing throughout the city. Safia Samee Ali, NBC News, 3 Mar. 2021 And the city has set up several sites for distribution of non-potable or flushing water this week. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, 1 Mar. 2021 Y’all no longer need to bring out the boiling pot to have safe, potable water in your home, according to KHOU, which first broke the news this morning. Laura Furr Mericas, Chron, 21 Feb. 2021 The plan to pipe in non-potable water from the Central Arizona Project for irrigation on the reservation is designed to relieve pressure on the drinking water supply. Sarah Oven, The Arizona Republic, 1 Feb. 2021 Rainleaders would direct water into these caverns, and a pump would take the water back out for watering the lawn or garden, or for non-potable water use inside the home. Reuben Saltzman, Star Tribune, 6 Oct. 2020 Low-income black neighborhoods are often disproportionately impacted by a lack of potable water and higher levels of environmental toxins and air pollution. Sabrina Strings, Scientific American, 4 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Prior to the renovation, Magic Johnson Park used potable water to irrigate its gardens and grass lawns, of which there are no small number — the park checks in at a sizable 126 acres. Los Angeles Times, 20 May 2021 Planned to be built in two phases, the system will eventually supply 83 million gallons of potable water per day. David Garrick, San Diego Union-Tribune, 16 May 2021 An insufficient supply of potable water in many countries, mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa, has given rise to a new plastics economy driven by the increasing popularity of water sachets. Kingsley Kobo, Quartz, 16 May 2021 One of the core missions of a municipality is to provide clean, potable water to residents without it costing an arm and a leg. baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, 7 May 2021 All the parkway campgrounds have potable water, flush toilets, sinks, and dump stations, and the campsites include fire rings and picnic tables. Elizabeth Rhodes, Travel + Leisure, 27 Apr. 2021 Lack of potable water drove high Covid-19 rates in Native American communities, which helped get better representation in upcoming negotiations about Colorado River water. The Salt Lake Tribune, 30 Apr. 2021 In addition to household measures, golf courses would have to limit watering to greens and tees, and street cleaning and dust control with potable water would be prohibited. Kurtis Alexander, San Francisco Chronicle, 19 Apr. 2021 To maximize efficiencies, the lab wants to couple its efforts with other endeavors such as desalination and the creation of potable water. Ken Silverstein, Forbes, 11 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'potable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of potable

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

circa 1625, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for potable

Adjective

Middle English, from Late Latin potabilis, from Latin potare to drink; akin to Latin bibere to drink, Greek pinein

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Time Traveler for potable

Time Traveler

The first known use of potable was in the 15th century

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Statistics for potable

Cite this Entry

“Potable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/potable. Accessed 13 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for potable

potable

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of potable

technical : safe to drink

potable

adjective
po·​ta·​ble | \ ˈpōt-ə-bəl How to pronounce potable (audio) \

Medical Definition of potable

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: suitable for drinking potable water

potable

noun

Medical Definition of potable (Entry 2 of 2)

: a liquid that is suitable for drinking especially : an alcoholic beverage

More from Merriam-Webster on potable

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for potable

Nglish: Translation of potable for Spanish Speakers

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