poll

noun
\ ˈpōl \

Definition of poll

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : head
2a : the top or back of the head
b : nape
3 : the broad or flat end of a striking tool (such as a hammer)
4a(1) : the casting or recording of the votes of a body of persons
(2) : a counting of votes cast
b : the place where votes are cast or recorded usually used in plural at the polls
c : the period of time during which votes may be cast at an election
d : the total number of votes recorded a heavy poll
5a : a questioning or canvassing of persons selected at random or by quota to obtain information or opinions to be analyzed
b : a record of the information so obtained

poll

verb
polled; polling; polls

Definition of poll (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to cut off or cut short the hair or wool of : crop, shear
b : to cut off or cut short (a material, such as wool)
2a : to cut off or back the top of (something, such as a tree) specifically : pollard
b : to cut off or cut short the horns of (cattle)
3a : to receive and record the votes of
b : to request each member of to declare a vote individually poll the assembly
4 : to receive (votes) in an election
5 : to question or canvass in a poll
6 : to check (devices, such as several computer terminals sharing a single line) in sequence for messages waiting to be transmitted

intransitive verb

: to cast one's vote at a poll

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Other Words from poll

Verb

pollee \ pō-​ˈlē \ noun
poller \ ˈpō-​lər \ noun

Synonyms for poll

Synonyms: Noun

bean, block [slang], dome, head, mazard (or mazzard) [chiefly dialect], nob, noddle, noggin, noodle, nut [slang], pate

Synonyms: Verb

canvass (also canvas), interview, solicit, survey

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Examples of poll in a Sentence

Noun

The magazine conducted a poll to find out the favorite 100 movies of all time. A recent poll shows a decrease in the number of teenagers who smoke. The polls are open until 8:00 tonight.

Verb

About half of the people polled had tried smoking. The conservative candidate polled more than 10,000 votes in the last election.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Only 26 percent of Americans approve of congressional Republicans’ handling of the shutdown, compared to Democrats’ 36 percent approval rating, according to the HuffPost poll. Tara Golshan, Vox, "Trump’s approval rating drops to Charlottesville levels during shutdown," 27 Dec. 2018 According to an August Reuters/Ipsos poll, 70 percent of Americans approve of a Medicare-for-all policy, and 60 percent support free college tuition. Rebecca Nelson, Marie Claire, "Party Crashers: These Female Candidates Are Shaking Up The Midterms," 2 Nov. 2018 According to the poll, 74 percent of people supported standardized naming conventions for adaptive cruise control, lane keep, and other features that combine to make up systems like Autopilot. Sean O'kane, The Verge, "Tesla stopped promoting the ‘Full Self-Driving’ option for its cars," 20 Oct. 2018 But Trump may stand on sturdier political footing in the next stage of debate over how to deal with families accused of crossing the border illegally, according to a Washington Post-Schar School poll released last week. Scott Clement, Washington Post, "The public rejected Trump’s child-separation policy, but a majority supports his push to detain families until court hearings," 13 July 2018 Top 10 companies who’ve had a positive impact for Democrats and Republicans according to a Fortune and SurveyMonkey poll. Grace Donnelly, Fortune, "These Are the Fortune 500 Companies Loved by Both Urban and Rural America," 11 July 2018 The skepticism about Social Security's future shows up in one consumer poll after the other. Russ Wiles, azcentral, "Reality check: Social Security will survive, but will it be enough?," 8 July 2018 About 41 percent approved of his international trade policy, and 57 percent disapproved, according to the poll. Alana Abramson, Time, "Most Americans Don't Approve of Trump's Immigration Policies, Poll Finds," 6 July 2018 According to a poll in June, some 44% say Supreme Court judges older than 65 should not be allowed to give judgments; 33% disagree. The Economist, "Poland’s government sacks a third of its Supreme Court," 5 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Republican voters are still solidly behind Trump (his approval rating among Republicans polled by Gallup is at 86 percent). Jane Coaston, Vox, "Fox News demanded a government shutdown — and got one," 22 Dec. 2018 Fifty-seven percent of Democrats polled by Gallup have a favorable view of socialism, while just 47 percent of Democrats in the poll have positive feelings about capitalism. Adam Shaw, Fox News, "Socialism rises in Democratic Party as primary season of upsets comes to close," 18 Sep. 2018 Among those polled by Kaiser, the majority are unaware that the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate was repealed. Nicole Chavez, CNN, "Sen. Orrin Hatch calls Obamacare supporters 'stupidest, dumbass people'," 7 June 2018 And 72 percent of small owners polled by BizBuySell.com expected their financials to improve through 2018, largely as a result of tax changes. Lynn Brezosky, San Antonio Express-News, "Strong economy makes for brisk small business sales in San Antonio, U.S.," 14 May 2018 Those numbers are the lowest and highest, respectively, in the 16 metro areas polled by Elon University and American City Business Journals. Tim Logan, BostonGlobe.com, "Poll: Many Bostonians aren’t breathlessly following the race to land Amazon’s HQ2," 18 Apr. 2018 Companies polled by the RBI said input and output prices were rising and this could be passed on to consumers. Bloomberg.com, "India's RBI Paints a ‘Goldilocks’ Economy as Trade War Looms," 5 Apr. 2018 Forza Italia, which marks its 25th anniversary on Friday, has been polling at about 8% in recent months, down from 14% in the March election and far off the almost 30% the party got at its apex at the beginning of the century. Eric Sylvers, WSJ, "Italy’s Berlusconi Is Back for One More Try," 17 Jan. 2019 Analysts polled by FactSet expected $10.72 billion. Andrew Tangel, WSJ, "Delta Expects Shutdown to Hurt Revenue," 15 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'poll.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of poll

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for poll

Noun

Middle English pol, polle, from Middle Low German

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Dictionary Entries near poll

polka

polka dot

polka mazurka

poll

pollack

pollam

pollan

Statistics for poll

Last Updated

15 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for poll

The first known use of poll was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for poll

poll

noun

English Language Learners Definition of poll

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an activity in which several or many people are asked a question or a series of questions in order to get information about what most people think about something
: the record of votes that were made by people in an election
British : the number of votes made in an election

poll

verb

English Language Learners Definition of poll (Entry 2 of 2)

: to ask (several or many people) a question or a series of questions in order to get information about what most people think about something
: to receive (a specified number or percentage of votes) in an election

poll

noun
\ ˈpōl \

Kids Definition of poll

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the casting or recording of the votes or opinions of a number of persons A poll showed a decrease in student interest.
2 : the place where votes are cast usually used in pl. We go to the polls tomorrow.

poll

verb
polled; polling

Kids Definition of poll (Entry 2 of 2)

: to question in order to get information or opinions about something She polled her classmates on their study habits.

poll

noun
\ ˈpōl \

Medical Definition of poll

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the head or a part of it especially : the region between the ears of some quadrupeds (as a horse)

Medical Definition of poll (Entry 2 of 3)

: to cut off or cut short the horns of (cattle)

poll

adjective

Medical Definition of poll (Entry 3 of 3)

: having no horns

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More from Merriam-Webster on poll

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with poll

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for poll

Spanish Central: Translation of poll

Nglish: Translation of poll for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of poll for Arabic Speakers

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