poll

1 of 2

noun

1
: head
2
a
: the top or back of the head
b
: nape
3
: the broad or flat end of a striking tool (such as a hammer)
4
a(1)
: the casting or recording of the votes of a body of persons
(2)
: a counting of votes cast
b
: the place where votes are cast or recorded
usually used in plural
at the polls
c
: the period of time during which votes may be cast at an election
d
: the total number of votes recorded
a heavy poll
5
a
: a questioning or canvassing of persons selected at random or by quota to obtain information or opinions to be analyzed
b
: a record of the information so obtained

poll

2 of 2

verb

polled; polling; polls

transitive verb

1
a
: to cut off or cut short the hair or wool of : crop, shear
b
: to cut off or cut short (a material, such as wool)
2
a
: to cut off or back the top of (something, such as a tree)
specifically : pollard
b
: to cut off or cut short the horns of (cattle)
3
a
: to receive and record the votes of
b
: to request each member of to declare a vote individually
poll the assembly
4
: to receive (votes) in an election
5
: to question or canvass in a poll
6
: to check (devices, such as several computer terminals sharing a single line) in sequence for messages waiting to be transmitted

intransitive verb

: to cast one's vote at a poll
pollee noun
poller noun

Examples of poll in a Sentence

Noun The magazine conducted a poll to find out the favorite 100 movies of all time. A recent poll shows a decrease in the number of teenagers who smoke. The polls are open until 8:00 tonight. Verb About half of the people polled had tried smoking. The conservative candidate polled more than 10,000 votes in the last election.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Last August, President Zelensky was asked for his position in an interview on Ukrainian television and sounded sympathetic to holding a poll. Andrew Carey, Olga Voitovych, and Svitlana Vlasova, CNN, 31 Mar. 2024 Music fans voted in a poll published Friday (March 29) on Billboard, choosing the BTS member’s solo mini-album as their favorite new music release of the past week. Ashley Iasimone, Billboard, 31 Mar. 2024 The same poll also found that Newsom’s approval rating among Californians had dropped to 46%, which may partially explain why his ballot measure fared so poorly despite spending $15 million on the campaign. Dan Walters, The Mercury News, 29 Mar. 2024 Among Republicans, around half favor a decrease in legal immigration, a share that rose to two-thirds among pro-Donald Trump Republicans, according to a Chicago Council poll taken last September. Simon Montlake, The Christian Science Monitor, 28 Mar. 2024 Recent polls show two-thirds of Gazans blaming Israel for their suffering, and most of the rest blaming the United States, while in the West Bank support for armed struggle has risen. Phil Klay, The Atlantic, 28 Mar. 2024 In November 2023, one month after the start of the war, approval of the military action was at 50%, while 45% disapproved of Israel's military action, according to the Gallup poll. Nadine El-Bawab, ABC News, 28 Mar. 2024 An Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll last year found that only 22 percent of Republicans had high confidence that votes in the 2024 presidential election would be counted accurately, compared with 71 percent of Democrats. Isaac Arnsdorf, Washington Post, 28 Mar. 2024 Republicans have owned the issue for years, and polls say most Americans see the border as a serious problem and among the most important issues facing the country. Michael Smolens, San Diego Union-Tribune, 17 Mar. 2024
Verb
That was below what economists polled by FactSet forecast. Elisabeth Buchwald, CNN, 29 Mar. 2024 The difference in opinion over Israel’s conduct is starker along religious lines, with 62 percent of American Jews saying Israel’s war conduct is acceptable and 5 percent of American Muslims saying so, according to the survey, which polled 12,693 adults in the United States last month. Bryan Pietsch, Washington Post, 21 Mar. 2024 Of those polled, 48% of white people were most likely to have received fertility care or know someone who had, compared to 26% of Black people. Alyssa Newcomb, Fortune, 18 Mar. 2024 The two are polling closely, and it’s led the candidates to really crank up the MAGA pageantry. Nathaniel Rakich, ABC News, 18 Mar. 2024 But, at the moment, none of these people poll better against Trump than Biden does, or have enough money on hand to mount a serious campaign. Evan Osnos, The New Yorker, 4 Mar. 2024 That's a slight increase from January 2022, when about half of those polled expressed similar concerns. TIME, 4 Mar. 2024 Full enterprise resource planning (ERP) platforms account for 33% of all responses, while e-commerce systems have been cited by only 10% of those polled. Angelica Mari, Forbes, 28 Feb. 2024 Analysts polled by FactSet expect full-year earnings of $7.04 on revenue of $31.68 billion. Michelle Chapman, Quartz, 14 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'poll.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English pol, polle, from Middle Low German

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of poll was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near poll

Cite this Entry

“Poll.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/poll. Accessed 14 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

poll

1 of 2 noun
1
b
: the top or back of the head
2
a
: the casting or recording of votes
b
: the place where votes are cast or recorded
usually used in plural
at the polls
3
: a questioning of persons to obtain information or opinions

poll

2 of 2 verb
1
a
: to take and record the votes of
b
: to request each member of to declare his or her vote individually
poll a jury
2
: to receive votes in an election
the candidate polled 10,000 votes
3
: to question (people) or cover (an area) in a poll
4
: to cast one's vote at a poll
poller noun

Medical Definition

poll

1 of 3 noun
: the head or a part of it
especially : the region between the ears of some quadrupeds (as a horse)

poll

2 of 3 transitive verb
: to cut off or cut short the horns of (cattle)

poll

3 of 3 adjective
: having no horns

More from Merriam-Webster on poll

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