placate

verb
pla·​cate | \ ˈplā-ˌkāt How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla- How to pronounce placate (audio) \
placated; placating

Definition of placate

transitive verb

: to soothe or mollify especially by concessions : appease

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Other Words from placate

placater noun
placatingly \ ˈplā-​ˌkā-​tiŋ-​lē How to pronounce placatingly (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adverb
placation \ plā-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce placation (audio) , pla-​ \ noun
placative \ ˈplā-​ˌkā-​tiv How to pronounce placative (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adjective
placatory \ ˈplā-​kə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce placatory (audio) , ˈpla-​ \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for placate

pacify, appease, placate, mollify, propitiate, conciliate mean to ease the anger or disturbance of. pacify suggests a soothing or calming. pacified by a sincere apology appease implies quieting insistent demands by making concessions. appease their territorial ambitions placate suggests changing resentment or bitterness to goodwill. a move to placate local opposition mollify implies soothing hurt feelings or rising anger. a speech that mollified the demonstrators propitiate implies averting anger or malevolence especially of a superior being. propitiated his parents by dressing up conciliate suggests ending an estrangement by persuasion, concession, or settling of differences. conciliating the belligerent nations

Soothe Yourself With the History of Placate

The earliest documented uses of "placate" in English date from the late 17th century. The word is derived from Latin placatus, the past participle of "placare," and even after more than 300 years in English, it still carries the basic meaning of its Latin ancestor: to soothe or "to appease." Other "placare" descendants in English are "implacable" (meaning "not easily soothed or satisfied") and "placation" ("the act of soothing or appeasing"). Even "please" itself, derived from Latin placēre ("to please"), is a distant relative of "placate."

Examples of placate in a Sentence

Although Rumsfeld was later thrown overboard by the Administration in an attempt to placate critics of the Iraq War, his military revolution was here to stay. — Jeremy Scahill, Nation, 2 Apr. 2007 The first step that women took in their emancipation was to adopt traditional male roles: to insist on their right to wear trousers, not to placate, not to smile, not to be decorative. — Fay Weldon, Harper's, May 1998 These spirits inhabited natural objects, like rivers and mountains, including celestial bodies, like the sun and moon. They had to be placated and their favors sought in order to ensure the fertility of the soil and the rotation of the seasons. — Stephen W. Hawking, A Brief History of Time, 1988 But it seems important to the Thunderbirds to make a big deal out of this; evidently it placates congressmen who don't think the Air Force should be in show biz. — Frank Deford, Sports Illustrated, 3 Aug. 1987 The administration placated protesters by agreeing to consider their demands. The angry customer was not placated by the clerk's apology.
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Recent Examples on the Web With an eye on his re-election campaign, Trump has increasingly sought to placate farmers who overwhelmingly supported him in 2016. NBC News, "U.S. has paid more than $1M in interest for late bailout payments to farmers," 28 Aug. 2019 If Nike could receive a portion of earnings it might be placated. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "Kawhi Leonard vs. Nike: Analyzing the Raptors' Star's Logo Lawsuit," 4 June 2019 But unlike with Mack - a far more valuable player by almost any measure, including age, position and personality - Gruden did backflips to try to placate Brown. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "Was Antonio Brown saga a ploy? A Patriots game? Or just Raiders as usual?," 7 Sep. 2019 Ayres, the pollster, said a base-first strategy could work for Trump if Democrats nominate a candidate who tries to placate Democratic activists at the expense of more moderate voters. Anchorage Daily News, "Analysis: Trump dials up culture wars in divisive play for 2020 votes," 13 Aug. 2019 American-Jewish liberals may have agonised over Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians, but many saw a beleaguered country doing its best to placate an enemy bent on its destruction. The Economist, "Donald Trump presses Israel into barring entry to American congresswomen," 16 Aug. 2019 But those numbers also could be affected by, at best, the changing lineups exacerbated by the Bulls now using Lopez and Holiday for spot minutes to placate the league’s new rest rules. K.c. Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "Bulls' core tries to find chemistry amid experimental lineups," 11 Mar. 2018 None of this will placate cynics who see the entire exercise as a boondoggle. John King, SFChronicle.com, "Park-topped Transbay transit center pays architectural dividends, past troubles aside," 26 Aug. 2019 Getting rid of targeted ads on children’s content could hit Google’s bottom line — but this solution would be far less expensive than other potential remedies that aim to placate regulators. Mark Bergen, Los Angeles Times, "YouTube plans to end targeted ads on videos aimed at kids," 20 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'placate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of placate

1678, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for placate

Latin placatus, past participle of placare — more at please

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Statistics for placate

Last Updated

4 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for placate

The first known use of placate was in 1678

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More Definitions for placate

placate

verb
How to pronounce placate (audio) How to pronounce placate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of placate

formal : to cause (someone) to feel less angry about something

placate

verb
pla·​cate | \ ˈplā-ˌkāt How to pronounce placate (audio) , ˈpla-\
placated; placating

Kids Definition of placate

: to calm the anger of The apology did little to placate customers.

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More from Merriam-Webster on placate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for placate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with placate

Spanish Central: Translation of placate

Nglish: Translation of placate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of placate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on placate

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