pass off

verb

passed off; passing off; passes off

transitive verb

1
: to make public or offer for sale with intent to deceive
2
: to give a false identity or character to

Examples of pass off in a Sentence

the con man tried to pass off a piece of blue glass as a sapphire
Recent Examples on the Web In a complaint, pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences claimed that more than 200 individuals and companies across the U.S. were passing off antipsychotic pills as the company’s HIV medications. Grethel Aguila, Miami Herald, 29 Jan. 2024 Much of what is online now comes from past conflicts, including in Gaza itself, being passed off as new; search engines exist to help determine the truth. David Bauder, Fortune, 13 Nov. 2023 With a goal earlier in the period, Gibson received a pass off the wall in the right corner. Nathan Dunn, Kansas City Star, 29 Jan. 2024 With Brogdon defending, Russell faked a behind-the-back pass off the dribble, pushing the ball back to his right hand instead for a layup — giving himself the starring role in the highlight. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, 22 Jan. 2024 For-profit utility corporations pass off their infrastructure and fuel costs to Florida residents and businesses, who have very little opportunity to weigh in on the energy choices these utilities make. Brooke Ward, Sun Sentinel, 9 Jan. 2024 It was done incredibly well and Mr. Bernstein was too sincere and too able for it to be passed off as a mere stunt. Jeff Suess, The Enquirer, 14 Jan. 2024 This condescension underlies movies that pass off illogic and omissions as marks of fantasy and imagination—or, at least, as good enough for children. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, 11 Dec. 2023 In February, The Times reported that some drugstores in Tijuana and the Los Cabos area were selling loose pills over the counter, passing off tablets containing fentanyl and meth as expensive brand-name medications, including Percocet and Adderall. Keri Blakinger, Los Angeles Times, 30 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'pass off.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1681, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of pass off was in 1681

Dictionary Entries Near pass off

Cite this Entry

“Pass off.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pass%20off. Accessed 27 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

pass off

verb
: to give a false identity to : describe untruthfully

Legal Definition

pass off

transitive verb
1
: to make public or offer for sale (goods or services) with intent to deceive : palm off
passing his product off as that of the plaintiff'sW. L. Prosser and W. P. Keeton
see also unfair competition
2
: to give a false identity or character to
they created the documents on the day of the trial and passed them off as being made earlier

More from Merriam-Webster on pass off

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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