cutoff

1 of 2

noun

cut·​off ˈkət-ˌȯf How to pronounce cutoff (audio)
1
: the act or action of cutting off
2
a
: the new and relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow
c
: a channel made to straighten a stream
3
: a device for cutting off
4
a
: something cut off
b
cutoffs plural : shorts originally made from jeans with the legs cut off at the knees or higher
5
: the point, date, or period for a cutoff
cutoff adjective

cut off

2 of 2

verb

cut off; cutting off; cuts off

transitive verb

1
: to bring to an untimely end
Each one of those names reflects a life that was prematurely cut offJohn Kerry
2
: to stop the passage of
cut off communications
3
: shut off, bar
the river cut off their retreat
4
: discontinue, terminate
cut off a subscription
5
: separate, isolate
cut herself off from her family
6
a
: disinherit
threatened to cut him off without a penny
b
: to refuse to serve (someone) more alcohol
The bartender cut them off.
7
a
: to stop the operation of : turn off
cut off the engine
b
: to stop or interrupt while in communication
the operator cut me off

intransitive verb

: to cease operating

Examples of cutoff in a Sentence

Noun a cutoff of the water supply The cutoff for new applications is next Wednesday. Verb the majority party cut off debate and forced a vote on the bill the dog cut off the one sheep that had to be sheared
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Head coach Claude Mathis and the Eagles’ enrollment fell below the Class 6A cutoff, but the program opted to stay in Class 6A and continue to play against the largest schools in Texas. Charles Baggarly, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 1 Feb. 2024 The cutoff for voters to change their party affiliation was in October. Lalee Ibssa, ABC News, 19 Jan. 2024 Hall, who appeared in the majors in both 2022 and 2023, is once again in the top 100 because his 29 career MLB appearances are one short of Baseball America’s cutoff for prospect eligibility. Jacob Calvin Meyer, Baltimore Sun, 17 Jan. 2024 The state enacted one of the most important recommendations of the study panel, which was for Medicaid to cover 12 postpartum months rather than the existing cutoff at 60 days. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 26 Jan. 2024 But some Long COVID patient-advocacy groups swiftly denounced the study, lamenting that the framework’s scoring cutoff would leave thousands of sick people without a diagnosis. Rachael Bedard, The New Yorker, 23 Jan. 2024 With his cutoff hoodies and ever-present scowl, Belichick teamed with quarterback Tom Brady to lead the Patriots to six Super Bowl victories, nine AFC titles and 17 division championships in 19 years. Kyle Hightower, Twin Cities, 11 Jan. 2024 Carey’s Christmas classic crowns the chart ahead of multiple fellow holiday standards as Christmas Day neared (the chart’s latest cutoff was Christmas Eve, Dec. 24). Kevin Rutherford, Billboard, 28 Dec. 2023 Candidates who want to show their fundraising muscle can reflect the donations on their campaign finance reports, which have a Dec. 31 cutoff date. Mary Jo Pitzl, The Arizona Republic, 12 Jan. 2024
Verb
In 2022, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed that public web data does belong to the public—however, the public can only access it if tech giants do not cut off access to the mass repositories through API limitations. Or Lenchner, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 The two sides have been cut off from each other since 1953, when an armistice ended the Korean War, and remain technically at war. Simone McCarthy, CNN, 15 Feb. 2024 Truman resisted, but the requests, even threats, finally forced him to cut off his phone and retire to the country. Gloria Steinem, Vogue, 14 Feb. 2024 In November, the company abandoned plans to spin off its cloud-computing unit, blaming U.S. tech export controls that threaten to cut off the Chinese company’s access to advanced chips. Lionel Lim, Fortune Asia, 8 Feb. 2024 And building the dike in Kazakhstan cut off the south part of the sea in Uzbekistan from its crucial water source. Victoria Milko, Quartz, 8 Feb. 2024 Unfortunately, it's been difficult for Sudi to gain strength because of how her abuser cut off her paws. Kelli Bender, Peoplemag, 8 Feb. 2024 Yet, at the same time, also obeying Trump, House Republicans are determined to cut off military aid for Ukraine. Trudy Rubin, Twin Cities, 4 Feb. 2024 Shark finning, which is when fishers catch a shark, cut off its fin and dump its body back in the ocean, is prevalent due in part to the popularity of shark fin soup in China. Will Sullivan, Smithsonian Magazine, 2 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'cutoff.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Noun

1741, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1565, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of cutoff was in 1565

Dictionary Entries Near cutoff

Cite this Entry

“Cutoff.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cutoff. Accessed 21 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

cutoff

1 of 2 noun
cut·​off ˈkət-ˌȯf How to pronounce cutoff (audio)
1
a
: the action of cutting off
b
: the point or date that cutting off occurs
2
: a device for cutting off
3
plural : shorts made from jeans with the legs cut off short
cutoff adjective

cut off

2 of 2 verb
ˌkət-ˈȯf
1
: to stop the flow or movement of
cut off a supply
2
: isolate
cut off from the world
3
: discontinue sense 2
they cut off relations with us
4
: to stop from talking
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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