conclusion

noun
con·​clu·​sion | \ kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio) \

Definition of conclusion

1a : a reasoned judgment : inference The obvious conclusion is that she was negligent.
b : the necessary consequence of two or more propositions taken as premises especially : the inferred proposition of a syllogism
2 : the last part of something The team was exhausted at the conclusion of the game. : such as
a : result, outcome The peace talks came to a successful conclusion.
b conclusions plural : trial of strength or skill used in the phrase try conclusions
c : a final summation the counsel's conclusion to the jury
d : the final decision in a law case
e : the final part of a pleading in law
3 : an act or instance of concluding hoped for a quick conclusion to the war

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Examples of conclusion in a Sentence

The evidence does not support the report's conclusions. The evidence points to the inescapable conclusion that she was negligent. The logical conclusion is that she was negligent. What led you to that conclusion? They haven't yet arrived at a conclusion. the conclusion of a business deal The case was finally brought to conclusion last week.
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Recent Examples on the Web His recent insistence that covid-19 probably emerged from a Chinese laboratory—a conclusion American spies appear not to share—was of this pattern. The Economist, "Lexington Mike Pompeo’s politicisation of foreign policy is unworthy of him," 16 May 2020 But that conclusion, while widely shared by public health authorities eyeing the same smartphone data, is at least one step beyond what the science can reliably show at this point, epidemiologists say. Washington Post, "The limits of smartphone data are on display as the country seeks to reopen," 14 May 2020 The conclusion: Certain communities are more susceptible to pandemics and need specific prevention efforts. Sidney Fussell, Wired, "The H1N1 Crisis Predicted Covid-19’s Toll on Black Americans," 6 May 2020 That left employers surprised when the IRS reached the opposite conclusion, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce last week urged the administration to reverse course. Richard Rubin, WSJ, "Lawmakers Urge IRS to Rethink Tax-Credit Rule Affecting Furloughed Workers," 4 May 2020 The conclusion of the NFL draft marks an end to a hectic stretch of change throughout the league. Michael Middlehurst-schwartz, USA TODAY, "8 NFL players still in flux after draft: Jadeveon Clowney, Cam Newton face uncertainty," 1 May 2020 Behold: @joealwynInstagram @joealwynInstagram @joealwynInstagram The obvious conclusion? Emily Dixon, Marie Claire, "Joe Alwyn Offered a Rare Glimpse of His Life With Taylor Swift on Instagram," 30 Apr. 2020 Wisconsin finished only 8-10 in the Big Ten that year and wasn't a sure thing to make the NCAA field at 17-10 overall and a 3-7 conclusion to the year, including two setbacks against lowly Northwestern. Jr Radcliffe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "50 in 50: UW-Green Bay stuns Cal and Jason Kidd in NCAA Tournament," 24 Apr. 2020 Kavanaugh, who largely agreed with the majority’s conclusions, parted ways with them to outline his own test for setting stare decisis aside. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "The Supreme Court’s War Over Jury Trials Could Change Everything," 21 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conclusion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conclusion

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for conclusion

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin conclusion-, conclusio, from concludere — see conclude

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Time Traveler for conclusion

Time Traveler

The first known use of conclusion was in the 14th century

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Statistics for conclusion

Last Updated

18 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Conclusion.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conclusion. Accessed 25 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for conclusion

conclusion

noun
How to pronounce conclusion (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of conclusion

: a final decision or judgment : an opinion or decision that is formed after a period of thought or research
: the last part of something
: the act of concluding or finishing something or the state of being finished

conclusion

noun
con·​clu·​sion | \ kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio) \

Kids Definition of conclusion

1 : final decision reached by reasoning I came to the conclusion that the plan won't work.
2 : the last part of something
3 : a final settlement We had hoped for a quick conclusion of the conflict.

conclusion

noun
con·​clu·​sion | \ kən-ˈklü-zhən How to pronounce conclusion (audio) \

Legal Definition of conclusion

1 : a judgment or opinion inferred from relevant facts our conclusion upon the present evidenceMissouri v. Illinois, 200 U.S. 496 (1905)
2a : a final summarizing (as of a closing argument)
b : the last or closing part of something
3 : an opinion or judgment offered without supporting evidence specifically : an allegation made in a pleading that is not based on facts set forth in the pleading

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