disinherit

verb
dis·in·her·it | \ˌdis-in-ˈher-ət, -ˈhe-rət\

Definition of disinherit 

transitive verb

1 : to prevent deliberately from inheriting something (as by making a will)

2 : to deprive of natural or human rights or of previously held special privileges

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Other Words from disinherit

disinheritance \-ˈher-ə-tən(t)s, -ˈhe-rə- \ noun

Examples of disinherit in a Sentence

She threatened to disinherit her son and leave him penniless.

Recent Examples on the Web

Jane’s son Edward was at best a useless boy-king, and at worst a divisive religious extremist who disinherited his sisters. Anne Thériault, Longreads, "Queens of Infamy: Anne Boleyn," 25 May 2018 According to court documents, Nupson’s mother considered disinheriting her because of her personal problems. Bob Fernandez, Philly.com, "Phillies' co-owner John Middleton settles with sister for $22M," 26 Feb. 2018 As an only son, he was essentially disinherited from his mother’s legacy. Chioma Nnadi, Vogue, "This Artist Is Wearing His Mother’s Clothing to Promote Social Change in Ghana," 20 Oct. 2017 At the beginning, he had been reviled and disinherited by his harsh warrior father Randyll Tarly, who sent him to the Night's Watch where he was mocked and abused. Bill Keveney, USA TODAY, "John Bradley's Sam Tarly proves a different kind of hero on HBO's 'Game of Thrones'," 13 Aug. 2017 The rest of the verdict was for a series of moves through which Roberta Dickson essentially disinherited Shook. Andrew Wolfson, The Courier-Journal, "Family feud: Mother uses bankruptcy to keep daughter from collecting $3.2M verdict," 26 July 2017 Remember that among the disinherited there’s a mystic language. Nancy Princenthal, New York Times, "Raymond Pettibon: Pictures, Literary Voices and Surfers, Too," 30 Dec. 2016 This hurricane disinherited the meek, who were supposed to inherit the earth. By Michael Browning, miamiherald, "A desolated landscape: the toll of Hurricane Andrew," 25 Aug. 2015 Some, for example, decide to disinherit an unloving child. Leonard Schwarz, The Mercury News, "Money Manners: Plan to inherit nothing and you won’t be disappointed," 15 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disinherit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disinherit

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for disinherit

Middle English

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Time Traveler for disinherit

The first known use of disinherit was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for disinherit

disinherit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of disinherit

: to prevent (someone, such as your daughter or son) from having the legal right to receive your money or property after you die

disinherit

verb
dis·in·her·it | \ˌdi-sᵊn-ˈher-ət \
disinherited; disinheriting

Kids Definition of disinherit

: to take away the legal right to receive money or property from at death The millionaire disinherited his son.

disinherit

transitive verb
dis·in·her·it | \ˌdis-ᵊn-ˈher-ət \

Legal Definition of disinherit 

: to prevent deliberately from inheriting something (as by making a will) — see also elective share

Other Words from disinherit

disinheritance \-ˈher-ə-təns \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on disinherit

Spanish Central: Translation of disinherit

Nglish: Translation of disinherit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of disinherit for Arabic Speakers

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to reject or criticize sharply

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