inherit

verb
in·​her·​it | \ in-ˈher-ət How to pronounce inherit (audio) , -ˈhe-rət \
inherited; inheriting; inherits

Definition of inherit

transitive verb

1a : to receive from an ancestor as a right or title descendible by law at the ancestor's death
b : to receive as a devise or legacy
2 : to receive from a parent or ancestor by genetic transmission inherit a defective enzyme
3 : to have in turn or receive as if from an ancestor inherited the problem from his predecessor
4 : to come into possession of or receive especially as a right or divine portion and every one who has left houses or brothers or sisters … for my name's sake, will receive a hundredfold, and inherit eternal life — Matthew 19:29 (Revised Standard Version)

intransitive verb

: to take or hold a possession or rights by inheritance

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Other Words from inherit

inheritor \ in-​ˈher-​ə-​tər How to pronounce inherit (audio) , -​ˈhe-​rə-​ \ noun
inheritress \ in-​ˈher-​ə-​trəs How to pronounce inherit (audio) , -​ˈhe-​rə-​ \ or inheritrix \ in-​ˈher-​ə-​(ˌ)triks How to pronounce inherit (audio) , -​ˈhe-​rə-​ \ noun

Examples of inherit in a Sentence

She inherited the family business from her father. Baldness is inherited from the mother's side of the family. She inherited her father's deep blue eyes. She inherited a love of baseball from her dad. When my brother left for college, I inherited his old computer. The company's new president will inherit some complicated legal problems. When the coach quit, her assistant inherited a last-place team.
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Recent Examples on the Web The Democratic Party is close enough to the academy that its Presidential Administrations tend to inherit cutting-edge ideas, simply through the act of staffing. Benjamin Wallace-wells, The New Yorker, "Biden’s New Deal and the Future of Human Capital," 1 Apr. 2021 Conservative commentator Dan Bongino has joined a scramble to inherit the radio talk show mantle left behind by the death of Rush Limbaugh. David Bauder, chicagotribune.com, "Dan Bongino tapped to fill Rush Limbaugh’s WLS radio slot in May," 18 Mar. 2021 Conservative commentator Dan Bongino has joined a scramble to inherit the radio talk show mantle left behind by the death of Rush Limbaugh. David Bauder, Star Tribune, "Dan Bongino tapped for national afternoon radio slot in May," 18 Mar. 2021 Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's unborn daughter can expect to inherit not just a chicken coop in Santa Barbara and a host of celebrity friends, but a Cartier Tank watch, courtesy of her mom. Elizabeth Logan, Glamour, "Meghan Markle Already Has the Prettiest Heirloom for Her Daughter," 12 Mar. 2021 Luigi grew up in royal courts and army camps — and, as the eldest son, was expected to inherit the title of marquis. Erik Brady, USA TODAY, "Why Gonzaga's namesake saint is a perfect fit in 2021 men's basketball season," 8 Mar. 2021 Although Gridley had initially planned to go alone, he was persuaded otherwise by the combination of Martha’s charms and a provision of his father’s will requiring him to procreate to inherit his portion of the family estate. Marc M. Arkin, WSJ, "‘Doomed Romance’ Review: An Ideal Relationship," 5 Mar. 2021 And their mothers—each determined to see her child inherit a better life—will make choices that will haunt them for decades to come. Perri Ormont Blumberg, Southern Living, "Jenna Bush Hager's Incredible March Book Club Pick Is Set in Piedmont, North Carolina," 2 Mar. 2021 Ken will wait until his father dies to inherit his company and sell it for cash. Roxana Hadadi, Vulture, "Freaks and Geeks Sends Lindsay Into Retreat," 18 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inherit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inherit

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 4

History and Etymology for inherit

Middle English enheriten "to give (a person) right of inheritance, make (a person) heir, come into possession of as an heir," borrowed from Anglo-French enheriter, going back to Late Latin inhērēditāre "to appoint as heir," from Latin in- in- entry 2 + Late Latin hērēditāre "to leave as an inheritance, inherit, make an heir" — more at heritage

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Time Traveler for inherit

Time Traveler

The first known use of inherit was in the 14th century

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Statistics for inherit

Last Updated

6 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Inherit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inherit. Accessed 16 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for inherit

inherit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of inherit

: to receive (money, property, etc.) from someone when that person dies
biology : to have (a characteristic, disease, etc.) because of the genes that you get from your parents when you are born
: to get (a personal quality, interest, etc.) because of the influence or example of your parents or other relatives

inherit

verb
in·​her·​it | \ in-ˈher-ət How to pronounce inherit (audio) \
inherited; inheriting

Kids Definition of inherit

1 : to get by legal right from a person at his or her death
2 : to get by heredity I inherited red hair.

inherit

transitive verb
in·​her·​it | \ in-ˈher-ət How to pronounce inherit (audio) \

Medical Definition of inherit

: to receive from a parent or ancestor by genetic transmission

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inherit

verb
in·​her·​it | \ in-ˈher-it How to pronounce inherit (audio) \

Legal Definition of inherit

transitive verb

1 : to receive (property) from an estate by operation of the laws of intestacy broadly : to receive (property) either by will or through intestate succession
2 : succeed

intransitive verb

: to take or hold a possession or rights by inheritance

Other Words from inherit

inheritor \ in-​ˈher-​i-​tər How to pronounce inherit (audio) \ noun

History and Etymology for inherit

Middle French enheriter to make one an heir, from Late Latin inhereditare, from Latin in- in + hereditas inheritance

More from Merriam-Webster on inherit

Nglish: Translation of inherit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of inherit for Arabic Speakers

Comments on inherit

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