outcry

noun

out·​cry ˈau̇t-ˌkrī How to pronounce outcry (audio)
1
a
: a loud cry : clamor
b
: a vehement protest
2

Examples of outcry in a Sentence

They were surprised by the outcry against the casino proposal. There was a lot of public outcry over his racial comments.
Recent Examples on the Web Late last week, outcry over the company’s Gemini AI image rendering tool returning historically inaccurate racial depictions led the company to take that function offline. Cfo, Forbes, 27 Feb. 2024 Thwaite took over as the bank’s chief executive following the resignation of his predecessor, Alison Rose last July, following outcry over the bank’s decision to close the account of far-right politician Nigel Farage. Peter Vanham, Fortune Europe, 20 Feb. 2024 After community outcry, the district’s board paused that plan and voted in January 2023 to close just two campuses: Longfellow Elementary School and Troost Elementary School, both of which district officials said were under-enrolled and outdated. Silas Allen, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 20 Feb. 2024 The Oak Rose apartments were slated to be built near Elk Grove Boulevard and Kent Street, but city officials have decided to relocate it after public outcry from residents. Marcus D. Smith, Sacramento Bee, 15 Feb. 2024 Messi's no-show sparks an outcry in Hong Kong on February 4, 2024. ‘Not sincere at all’ A statement released on Messi’s official Weibo social media account minutes before the start of the match in Tokyo appeared as an attempt to calm the backlash. Simone McCarthy, CNN, 8 Feb. 2024 The outcry essentially suggested that Swift and Kelce – both 34 – are liberal political operatives who’ll weaponize exposure from the Super Bowl and encourage young people to register as and vote for Democrats. Andre Mouchard, Orange County Register, 4 Feb. 2024 When the constitutional court, at the time headed by the president’s brother-in-law, changed the age eligibility rules that enabled Mr. Gibran to run for vice president, an online outcry did not trigger mass street protests. Kate Lamb, The Christian Science Monitor, 13 Feb. 2024 The arrest this week of an American woman in the West Bank by the Israel Defense Forces has prompted an outcry in the United States. Niha Masih, Washington Post, 8 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'outcry.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of outcry was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near outcry

Cite this Entry

“Outcry.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/outcry. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

outcry

noun
out·​cry ˈau̇t-ˌkrī How to pronounce outcry (audio)
1
: a loud cry : clamor
2
: a strong protest

More from Merriam-Webster on outcry

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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