officiate

verb
of·​fi·​ci·​ate | \ ə-ˈfi-shē-ˌāt How to pronounce officiate (audio) \
officiated; officiating

Definition of officiate

intransitive verb

1 : to perform a ceremony, function, or duty officiate at a wedding
2 : to act in an official capacity : act as an official (as at a sports contest)

transitive verb

1 : to carry out (an official duty or function)
2 : to serve as a leader or celebrant of (a ceremony)
3 : to administer the rules of (a game or sport) especially as a referee or umpire

Other Words from officiate

officiation \ ə-​ˌfi-​shē-​ˈā-​shən How to pronounce officiate (audio) \ noun

Examples of officiate in a Sentence

The bishop officiated the memorial Mass. Two referees officiated the hockey game.
Recent Examples on the Web In September 2021, Chaka became the first Black woman to officiate an NFL game, according to The Sporting News. Jacob Livesay, USA TODAY, 24 July 2022 One has even hired Ms. Stehman, a Universal Life Church minister, to officiate at their ceremony. New York Times, 11 May 2022 At the end, Styles is about to officiate a wedding until a storm propels him, bed and all, into the clouds. Marisa Whitaker, SPIN, 13 July 2022 Jefferson, who played 17 years in the NBA, will officiate the second quarter of Monday’s Summer League contest between the Portland Trail Blazers and New York Knicks, the league announced. oregonlive, 11 July 2022 So his mother, Fenice Yancy, rented out a space at the local rec center gym to organize a 3-on-3 tournament for Terry’s friends, picking up a referee whistle herself to officiate the competition. Julia Poe, Chicago Tribune, 27 June 2022 Lo van Pham, an engineer by day and a Big 12 official since 2015, will become the first Asian American to officiate in the NFL after he was hired as a side judge. Ben Volin, BostonGlobe.com, 14 May 2022 Speaking of Cheryl, Toni asks her ex to officiate her wedding in what might just be the cruelest move Toni has EVER made. Samantha Highfill, EW.com, 27 June 2022 He was invited to officiate games in the Lone Star Conference at the Division II level, then to the Southland Conference in Division I-AA. Lorenzo Reyes, USA TODAY, 6 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'officiate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of officiate

1623, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for officiate

borrowed from Medieval Latin officiātus, past participle of officiāre "to perform a function, perform priestly duties," going back to Late Latin officiārī "to perform a function," derivative of Latin officium "duty, office"

Learn More About officiate

Time Traveler for officiate

Time Traveler

The first known use of officiate was in 1623

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near officiate

officiary

officiate

officiator

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for officiate

Last Updated

4 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Officiate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/officiate. Accessed 9 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for officiate

officiate

verb
of·​fi·​ci·​ate | \ ə-ˈfi-shē-ˌāt How to pronounce officiate (audio) \
officiated; officiating

Kids Definition of officiate

1 : to perform a ceremony or duty A bishop officiated at the wedding.
2 : to act as an officer : preside She officiated at the annual meeting.

More from Merriam-Webster on officiate

Nglish: Translation of officiate for Spanish Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Odd Habits and Quirks

  • image1926873504
  • Which of the following best describes an easily irritated person?
Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!