obligor

noun

ob·​li·​gor ˌä-blə-ˈgȯr How to pronounce obligor (audio) -ˈjȯr How to pronounce obligor (audio)
: one who is bound by a legal obligation

Examples of obligor in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The Tax Section requests additional guidance to clarify that bona fide[5] loans outstanding at the obligor’s death to an entity in which the debtor has previously gifted an interest are not subject to the exceptions to the special rule. Alan Gassman, Forbes, 11 Aug. 2022 This issue appears to be as a mirror of the Delray Beach Florida issue except the obligor is being stiffed with an 8.5% interest rate. Richard Lehmann, Forbes, 8 Oct. 2021

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'obligor.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from Anglo-French, from obliger "to oblige" + -or -or entry 1

First Known Use

1541, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of obligor was in 1541

Dictionary Entries Near obligor

Cite this Entry

“Obligor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/obligor. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Legal Definition

obligor

noun
ob·​li·​gor ˌä-blə-ˈgȯr, -ˈjȯr How to pronounce obligor (audio)
: one who is bound by an obligation to another
an obligation extinguished by performance of the obligor
compare creditor, debtor, obligee, promisor, surety
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