objection

noun
ob·​jec·​tion | \ əb-ˈjek-shən How to pronounce objection (audio) \
plural objections

Definition of objection

1 : an act of objecting
2a : a reason or argument presented in opposition
b : a feeling or expression of disapproval
c : a statement of opposition to an aspect of a judicial or other legal proceeding file an objection to a proposed bankruptcy plan

Examples of objection in a Sentence

My main objection is that some people will have to pay more than others. He said he had no objection to the plan.
Recent Examples on the Web When asked if any of the lawmakers disagreed with the idea that the vice president had such authority, Hutchinson said there was no objection from any of the Republican lawmakers. Farnoush Amiri, Chicago Tribune, 1 May 2022 When asked if any of the lawmakers disagreed with the idea that the vice president had such authority, Hutchinson said there was no objection from any of the Republican lawmakers. Farnoush Amiri, ajc, 1 May 2022 This was the Screws Court’s objection to what is now Section 242. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, 23 Feb. 2022 What exactly is Sinema’s objection to the Democrats’ agenda? Daniel Strauss, The New Republic, 26 Oct. 2021 One lesson to take from all this is that a debtor's objection to a charging order on the grounds that the LLC is out-of-state and not subject to jurisdiction in-state will not prevent the charging order from being appropriately granted. Jay Adkisson, Forbes, 26 Apr. 2022 The same objection applies to suits brought under state law, but Rucho didn’t address that question. David B. Rivkin Jr. And Andrew M. Grossman, WSJ, 24 Apr. 2022 Mill doesn't tell us how to deal with the risk of viral notoriety, the sorites problem (in which individual expressions of criticism or objection add up to overwhelming disapproval), or the gender gap in tolerance for public disagreement. Samuel Goldman, The Week, 21 Mar. 2022 The haste with which Biden moved to demonstrate U.S. support for Taiwan—and the vehemence of China's objection to it—highlight the complexity of the Ukraine conflict. Clay Chandler, Fortune, 5 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'objection.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of objection

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for objection

Middle English objeccioun, borrowed from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French, borrowed from Late Latin objectiōn-, objectiō, from Latin obicere, objicere "to throw in the way, put forward, cite as a ground for disapproval or criticism" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action — more at object entry 1

Learn More About objection

Time Traveler for objection

Time Traveler

The first known use of objection was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near objection

objectify

objection

objectionability

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for objection

Last Updated

13 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Objection.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/objection. Accessed 23 May. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for objection

objection

noun
ob·​jec·​tion | \ əb-ˈjek-shən How to pronounce objection (audio) \

Kids Definition of objection

1 : an act of showing disapproval or great dislike
2 : a reason for or a feeling of disapproval Her main objection to the purchase is the price.

objection

noun
ob·​jec·​tion

Legal Definition of objection

1 : an act or instance of objecting specifically : a statement of opposition to an aspect of a judicial or other legal proceeding file an objection to a proposed bankruptcy plan
2 : a reason or argument forming the ground of an objection

Note: Objections at trial are generally made for the purpose of opposing the admission of improper evidence. Such an objection must be made in a timely manner. Objections prevent the jury from seeing or hearing the evidence and preserve the issue for appeal. Objections may also be made on the ground of the opposing counsel's improper methods (as leading a witness) or for other technical reasons.

More from Merriam-Webster on objection

Nglish: Translation of objection for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of objection for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Name That Food

  • a-light
  • Name these cookies!
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!