momentum

noun
mo·men·tum | \mō-ˈmen-təm, mə-\
plural momenta\-ˈmen-tə \ or momentums

Definition of momentum 

1 : a property (see property sense 1a) of a moving body that the body has by virtue of its mass (see mass entry 2 sense 1c) and motion and that is equal to the product of the body's mass and velocity broadly : a property of a moving body that determines the length of time required to bring it to rest when under the action of a constant force or moment

2 : strength or force gained by motion or by a series of events The wagon gained momentum as it rolled down the hill.

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Examples of momentum in a Sentence

The company has had a successful year and hopes to maintain its momentum by introducing new products. The movie loses momentum toward the end.

Recent Examples on the Web

When Rubin left Google in 2014, the whole robotics initiative seemed to lose momentum. Scott Kirsner, BostonGlobe.com, "After viral YouTube fame, Boston Dynamics is ready to sell its robots," 6 July 2018 However, even these programs could lose momentum if Pyongyang doesn't show genuine interest in denuclearization soon, experts said. Kim Tong-hyung, Fox News, "Fate of inter-Korean detente hangs on nuclear talks," 5 July 2018 Neither side wants to lose momentum but with one eye on the latter stages, caution will come before conviction and the group could be decided on fair play. SI.com, "World Cup Preview: England vs Belgium - Recent Form, Previous Encounter, Predictions & More," 27 June 2018 But Argentina lost momentum towards the end of the first half and when Victor Moses slid home a penalty after the frantic Mascherano pulled down Leon Balogun, Messi lost his way too. Thomas Allnutt, chicagotribune.com, "Messi delivers as Argentina scrape through to World Cup's last 16," 26 June 2018 But after the death in the 1990s of Dr. Ignatius, the church lost momentum. Sam Kestenbaum, New York Times, "A Forgotten Religion Gets a Second Chance in Brooklyn," 7 June 2018 There wasn't a whole lot of intrigue, or momentum shifts. Howard Fendrich, chicagotribune.com, "Illinois alumnus Kevin Anderson beats John Isner in longest semifinal in Wimbledon history," 13 July 2018 And the trend is picking up momentum as the Trump administration and Congress seek to soften federal regulations that were beefed up during the Obama years. Jon Marcus /, NBC News, "As the Trump administration pulls back, states step in to regulate questionable colleges," 6 July 2018 That early portion of of the show couldn’t really gather momentum for the crowd assembled on the Parkway because the concert is essentially a TV show (broadcast on NBC 10) complete with commercial breaks. Dan Deluca, Philly.com, "Pitbull lights up the Ben Franklin Parkway on the 4th of July," 4 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'momentum.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of momentum

1610, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for momentum

New Latin, from Latin, movement

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Statistics for momentum

Last Updated

4 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for momentum

The first known use of momentum was in 1610

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More Definitions for momentum

momentum

noun

English Language Learners Definition of momentum

: the strength or force that something has when it is moving

: the strength or force that allows something to continue or to grow stronger or faster as time passes

physics : the property that a moving object has due to its mass and its motion

momentum

noun
mo·men·tum | \mō-ˈmen-təm \

Kids Definition of momentum

: the force that a moving body has because of its weight and motion

momentum

noun
mo·men·tum | \mō-ˈment-əm, mə-ˈment- \
plural momenta\-ˈment-ə \ or momentums

Medical Definition of momentum 

: a property of a moving body that the body has by virtue of its mass and motion and that is equal to the product of the body's mass and velocity broadly : a property of a moving body that determines the length of time required to bring it to rest when under the action of a constant force

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