mollify

verb
mol·​li·​fy | \ ˈmä-lə-ˌfī How to pronounce mollify (audio) \
mollified; mollifying

Definition of mollify

transitive verb

1 : to soothe in temper or disposition : appease mollified the staff with a raise
2 : to reduce the rigidity of : soften Shaving cream mollifies the beard.
3 : to reduce in intensity : assuage, temper Time mollified his anger.

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Other Words from mollify

mollification \ ˌmä-​lə-​fə-​ˈkā-​shən How to pronounce mollification (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for mollify

pacify, appease, placate, mollify, propitiate, conciliate mean to ease the anger or disturbance of. pacify suggests a soothing or calming. pacified by a sincere apology appease implies quieting insistent demands by making concessions. appease their territorial ambitions placate suggests changing resentment or bitterness to goodwill. a move to placate local opposition mollify implies soothing hurt feelings or rising anger. a speech that mollified the demonstrators propitiate implies averting anger or malevolence especially of a superior being. propitiated his parents by dressing up conciliate suggests ending an estrangement by persuasion, concession, or settling of differences. conciliating the belligerent nations

The Difference Between Mollify, Appease, and Placate

Mollify, pacify, appease, and placate all mean "to ease the anger or disturbance of," although each implies a slightly different way of pouring oil on troubled waters. Pacify suggests the restoration of a calm or peaceful state, while appease implies the quieting of insistent demands by making concessions; you can appease appetites and desires as well as persons. Placate is similar to appease, but it often indicates a more complete transformation of bitterness to goodwill. Mollify, with its root in Latin mollis, meaning "soft," implies soothing hurt feelings or anger.

Examples of mollify in a Sentence

He tried to mollify his critics with an apology. All attempts to mollify the extremists have failed. The landlord fixed the heat, but the tenants still were not mollified.
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Recent Examples on the Web Under pressure, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday announced new policies to mollify advertisers. Danielle Abril, Fortune, "These big businesses are all boycotting Facebook ads," 26 June 2020 Several members are keen to mollify it, while a few would prefer to be tough. The Economist, "Identify yourself China’s next move in the South China Sea," 18 June 2020 The reason the city commissioned the report was to mollify critics of the police. Otis R. Taylor Jr., SFChronicle.com, "Critical assessment of Vallejo police no surprise to city’s residents," 15 June 2020 Thousands descend on Katy park for Black Lives Matter rally City of Katy representatives tried to mollify the objectors, noting that the Black Lives Matter protest at Katy Park was outside the city’s jurisdiction. Claire Goodman, Houston Chronicle, "City of Katy bows to community pressure, resurrects Fourth of July fireworks show," 9 June 2020 Releasing and pardoning the country’s most popular poet was meant to mollify the Russian elite. The Economist, "A quarantine rhapsody For Alexander Pushkin, lockdown was liberating," 4 June 2020 It’s more important to him to mollify the small group of followers who validate his insanity. Jeff Mcdonald, ExpressNews.com, "As George Floyd protests rage, Popovich goes all in on Trump," 1 June 2020 But Abbott’s support of Luther didn’t mollify conservative critics like former Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas. Dallas News, "Greg Abbott’s handling of coronavirus crisis critical to fate of Texas GOP in November, beyond," 22 May 2020 To mollify him, NATO is set to release new figures that will again show a rise in spending among European allies and Canada. Washington Post, "A glance at NATO’s aims for Dec. summit, as tensions simmer," 20 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mollify.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mollify

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for mollify

Middle English mollifien, from Middle French mollifier, from Late Latin mollificare, from Latin mollis soft; akin to Greek amaldynein to soften, Sanskrit mṛdu soft, and probably to Greek malakos soft, amblys dull, Old English meltan to melt

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Time Traveler for mollify

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The first known use of mollify was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

7 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mollify.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mollify. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for mollify

mollify

verb
How to pronounce mollify (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mollify

: to make (someone) less angry : to calm (someone) down

mollify

verb
mol·​li·​fy | \ ˈmä-lə-ˌfī How to pronounce mollify (audio) \
mollified; mollifying

Kids Definition of mollify

: to soothe in temper or disposition

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More from Merriam-Webster on mollify

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mollify

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with mollify

Spanish Central: Translation of mollify

Nglish: Translation of mollify for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mollify for Arabic Speakers

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