metaphor

noun
met·​a·​phor | \ ˈme-tə-ˌfȯr How to pronounce metaphor (audio) also -fər \

Definition of metaphor

1 : a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them (as in drowning in money) broadly : figurative language — compare simile
2 : an object, activity, or idea treated as a metaphor : symbol sense 2

Other Words from metaphor

metaphoric \ ˌme-​tə-​ˈfȯr-​ik How to pronounce metaphor (audio) , -​ˈfär-​ \ or metaphorical \ ˌme-​tə-​ˈfȯr-​i-​kəl How to pronounce metaphor (audio) , -​ˈfär-​ \ adjective

Synonyms for metaphor

Synonyms

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What is metaphor?

"You're a peach!" We've all heard the expression, and it's a good example of what we call metaphor. A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase denoting one kind of object or action is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them: the person being addressed in "you're a peach" is being equated with a peach, with the suggestion being that the person is pleasing or delightful in the way that a peach is pleasing and delightful. A metaphor is an implied comparison, as in "the silk of the singer's voice," in contrast to the explicit comparison of the simile, which uses like or as, as in "a voice smooth like silk."

When we use metaphor, we make a leap beyond rational, ho-hum comparison to an identification or fusion of two objects, resulting in a new entity that has characteristics of both: the voice isn't like silk; it is silk. Many critics regard the making of metaphors as a system of thought antedating or bypassing logic. Metaphor is the fundamental language of poetry, although it is common on all levels and in all kinds of language.

Lots of common words we use every day were originally vivid images, although they exist now as dead metaphors whose original aptness has been lost. The word daisy, for example, comes from an Old English word meaning "day's eye." The ray-like appearance of the daisy, which opens and closes with the sun, is reminiscent of an eye that opens in the morning and closes at night. The expression time flies is also metaphorical, with time being identified with a bird.

In poetry a metaphor may perform varied functions, from noting simple similarity between things to evoking a broad set of associations; it may exist as a minor element, or it may be the central concept and controlling image of the poem. The metaphor of an iron horse for a train, for example, is the elaborate central concept of one of Emily Dickinson's poems—though neither iron horse nor train appears in the poem, the first and final stanzas of which are:

I like to see it lap the Miles—

And lick the Valleys up—

And stop to feed itself at Tanks—

And then—prodigious step

And neigh like Boanerges—

Then—prompter than a Star

Stop—docile and omnipotent

At it's own stable door—

A mixed metaphor is the linking of two or more elements that don't go together logically. It happens when the writer or speaker isn't being sensitive to the literal meaning of the words or to the falseness of the comparison being used. A mixed metaphor is often two metaphors sloppily mashed together as in, "the ball is in the court of public opinion," which joins "the ball is in your court" to "the court of public opinion."

A mixed metaphor may also be used with great effectiveness, however, as in Hamlet's speech:

Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles

For strictly correct completion of the metaphor, sea should be replaced by a word like host. By using "sea of troubles," however, Shakespeare evokes the overwhelming nature of Hamlet's troubles.

Simile vs. Metaphor

Many people have trouble distinguishing between simile and metaphor. A glance at their Latin and Greek roots offers a simple way of telling these two closely-related figures of speech apart. Simile comes from the Latin word similis (meaning “similar, like”), which seems fitting, since the comparison indicated by a simile will typically contain the words as or like. Metaphor, on the other hand, comes from the Greek word metapherein (“to transfer”), which is also fitting, since a metaphor is used in place of something. “My love is like a red, red rose” is a simile, and “love is a rose” is a metaphor.

Examples of metaphor in a Sentence

You see, menudo is our chicken soup for the body and soul, our metaphor for bread-and-butter issues. — Joe Rodriguez, San Jose Mercury News, 20 May 2003 The hapless Humpty Dumpty often crops up as a metaphor for the second law of thermodynamics. — Charles Day, Physics Today, December 2002 Ben Strong, senior, football player, leader of the prayer group, the boy whose very name is a metaphor, has been besieged by the media for interviews. — Jayne Anne Phillips, Harper's, November 1998 The number of songs containing ambiguous metaphors and intriguing but obscure symbolism could be extended indefinitely. Still,  … there are hollers, work songs, field songs, and blues whose meaning is really not subject to a great deal of interpretation. — Lawrence W. Levine, "The Concept of the New Negro," 1971, in The Unpredictable Past1993 “He was drowning in paperwork” is a metaphor in which having to deal with a lot of paperwork is being compared to drowning in an ocean of water. Her poems include many imaginative metaphors. a poet admired for her use of metaphor See More
Recent Examples on the Web As a metaphor for the uncomfortable truths this drought has laid bare, the body in the barrel is grimly apt. Los Angeles Times, 6 May 2022 Fittingly, the presentation closed with an iridescent, reflective two-piece number that could serve as a metaphor for L’Enchanteur’s bright future. Cassandra Pintro, Vogue, 28 Apr. 2022 Until then, the image of Alice speeding down the runway — propellers cutting the air without the clack of combustion — stands as a metaphor for the promise of electric aviation: tantalizingly close to takeoff. Tim Dickinson, Rolling Stone, 19 Apr. 2022 As a metaphor, too, these astronomical events are evocatively imperfect: Our tiny little moon can occasionally blot out the sun the way an individual’s act of willful forgetfulness can all but obscure massive geopolitical upheaval. Jessica Kiang, Variety, 12 Apr. 2022 The multiverse could function as a metaphor for immigration, a person yanked out of familiar territory in pursuit of the possibilities of an unknown land. Washington Post, 8 Apr. 2022 The curators spoke of shifting sands as a metaphor for a country always in flux. Brian T. Allen, National Review, 31 Mar. 2022 This is what makes eating so powerful as a metaphor. New York Times, 18 Mar. 2022 The philosopher Aristotle used it as a metaphor in Poetics to describe a shedding of emotion, the impact that witnessing tragedy has on the body. Kole Fulmine, refinery29.com, 16 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'metaphor.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of metaphor

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for metaphor

Middle English methaphor, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear — more at bear

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Time Traveler for metaphor

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The first known use of metaphor was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near metaphor

metaphony

metaphor

metaphorically

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Statistics for metaphor

Last Updated

14 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Metaphor.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/metaphor. Accessed 16 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for metaphor

metaphor

noun
met·​a·​phor | \ ˈme-tə-ˌfȯr How to pronounce metaphor (audio) \

Kids Definition of metaphor

: a figure of speech comparing two unlike things without using like or as "Their cheeks were roses" is a metaphor while "their cheeks were like roses" is a simile.

More from Merriam-Webster on metaphor

Nglish: Translation of metaphor for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of metaphor for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about metaphor

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