longanimity

noun

lon·​ga·​nim·​i·​ty ˌlȯŋ-gə-ˈni-mə-tē How to pronounce longanimity (audio)
: a disposition to bear injuries patiently : forbearance

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Longanimity is a word with a long history. It came to English in the 15th century from the Late Latin adjective longanimis, meaning "patient" or "long-suffering." Longanimis, in turn, derives from the Latin combination of longus ("long") and animus ("soul"). Longus is related to English's long and is itself an ancestor to several other English words, including longevity ("long life"), elongate ("to make longer"), and prolong ("to lengthen in time"). Now used somewhat infrequently in English, longanimity stresses the character of one who, like the figure of Job in the Bible, endures prolonged suffering with extreme patience.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English longanymyte, from Late Latin longanimitat-, longanimitas, from longanimis patient, from Latin longus long + animus soul — more at animate

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of longanimity was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near longanimity

Cite this Entry

“Longanimity.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/longanimity. Accessed 24 May. 2024.

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