liqueur

noun
li·​queur | \ li-ˈkər How to pronounce liqueur (audio) , -ˈku̇r, -ˈkyu̇r How to pronounce liqueur (audio) \

Definition of liqueur

: a usually sweetened alcoholic liquor (such as brandy) flavored with fruit, spices, nuts, herbs, or seeds

Examples of liqueur in a Sentence

a bottle of orange liqueur
Recent Examples on the Web In cocktail shaker, combine vodka or whiskey, pumpkin liqueur and Irish cream. Add ice and shake until very cold, at least 1 minute. The Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen, Good Housekeeping, "Pumpkin Martini," 25 Sep. 2020 In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, combine the heavy cream, mascarpone, sugar, coffee liqueur, cocoa powder, espresso powder and vanilla. Paul Stephen, ExpressNews.com, "Recipe: Ina Garten’s Mocha Chocolate Icebox Cake," 2 Sep. 2020 Steldt served all those foods at her backyard fair — although the usual chocolate and root beer flavored milk were replaced by Tippy Cow liqueur. Amy Schwabe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "The pandemic sidelined this woman's annual State Fair birthday celebration. Here's what her family did instead.," 11 Aug. 2020 Whisk together coffee liqueur, vodka, and pumpkin pie spice in a measuring cup. Marian Cooper Cairns, Country Living, "Pumpkin Spice White Russian," 7 Sep. 2020 Salting a key cocktail component, such as a liqueur, is certainly more labor-intensive than using a saline solution or adding a pinch of salt, but the technique both reimagines the ingredient and allows for more control when mixing. Popular Science, "Why you should be adding salt to your cocktails," 4 Sep. 2020 Another drink to beat the Phoenix heat is the seasonal sorbet bellini, made with fruit liqueur, prosecco and sorbet. Tirion Morris, The Arizona Republic, "Say hello to Lylo, Phoenix's new poolside bar from the mastermind behind Bitter & Twisted," 2 Sep. 2020 When her heart failed suddenly, Kahlua— a paint the color of the Mexican liqueur and swaybacked like a hammock— went on a hunger strike. Jane Shore, The New Yorker, "The Couple," 31 Aug. 2020 Chareau Aloe liqueur, agave nectar, lemon and pomegranite juice. Andrea Reeves, The Enquirer, "We tried the food (and some sake drinks 🍶) at the new Teak in OTR 🍣," 27 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'liqueur.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of liqueur

1729, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for liqueur

French, from Old French licour liquid — more at liquor

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Time Traveler for liqueur

Time Traveler

The first known use of liqueur was in 1729

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Statistics for liqueur

Last Updated

18 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Liqueur.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/liqueur. Accessed 22 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for liqueur

liqueur

noun
How to pronounce liqueur (audio) How to pronounce liqueur (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of liqueur

: a sweet, strong alcoholic drink that is usually flavored with fruits or spices and drunk in small glasses after a meal

liqueur

noun
li·​queur | \ li-ˈkər How to pronounce liqueur (audio) , -ˈk(y)u̇(ə)r How to pronounce liqueur (audio) \

Medical Definition of liqueur

: a usually sweetened alcoholic beverage variously flavored (as with fruit or aromatics)

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Comments on liqueur

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