knock-on effect

noun

British
: something (such as a process, action, or event) that causes other things to happen
The drought is likely to have a knock-on effect throughout the whole economy.

Examples of knock-on effect in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web This year’s jump in oil prices has been raising worries about a knock-on effect on inflation, which has remained stubbornly high. Elaine Kurtenbach, Quartz, 16 Apr. 2024 This, of course, has a knock-on effect on Wall Street. Eleanor Pringle, Fortune, 18 Mar. 2024 Recently released figures from airports association, Airports Council International Europe, indicate that air traffic in Israel was down 62% in those three months, which has had a severe knock-on effect on JR/D Duty Free’s revenue. Kevin Rozario, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 Abattoirs and meat-processing plants were particularly hit, but, of course, this had a knock-on effect on butchers’ abilities to source and provide meat. Olivia Potts, Longreads, 15 Feb. 2024 Sources at the company are keen to point out that the new shake-up will not have any knock-on effect on projects currently in development or production at either Sky Studios or Sky U.K. and Ireland. K.j. Yossman, Variety, 8 Feb. 2024 That long three-setter had a knock-on effect that made for a light but long night at Melbourne Park. Simon Cambers, USA TODAY, 23 Jan. 2024 So amid a spike in crashes for cyclists, the city’s steady clip of bike-lane installation appears to be having a knock-on effect for pedestrians. John Surico, Curbed, 21 Dec. 2023 This can have the knock-on effect of restricting participation in various activities and gatherings, both of which significantly reduce quality of life. William A. Haseltine, Forbes, 11 Dec. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'knock-on effect.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Dictionary Entries Near knock-on effect

Cite this Entry

“Knock-on effect.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/knock-on%20effect. Accessed 27 May. 2024.

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