journey

noun
jour·​ney | \ ˈjər-nē How to pronounce journey (audio) \
plural journeys

Definition of journey

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something suggesting travel or passage from one place to another the journey from youth to maturity a journey through time
2 : an act or instance of traveling from one place to another : trip a three-day journey going on a long journey
3 chiefly dialectal : a day's travel

journey

verb
journeyed; journeying

Definition of journey (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to go on a journey : travel

transitive verb

: to travel over or through

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Other Words from journey

Verb

journeyer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for journey

Noun

journey, trip, and tour mean travel from one place to another. journey usually means traveling a long distance and often in dangerous or difficult circumstances. They made the long journey across the desert. trip can be used when the traveling is brief, swift, or ordinary. We took our weekly trip to the store. tour is used for a journey with several stops that ends at the place where it began. Sightseers took a tour of the city.

Did You Know?

The Latin adjective diurnus means “pertaining to a day, daily”; English diurnal stems ultimately from this word. When Latin developed into French, diurnus became a noun, jour, meaning simply “day” The medieval French derivative journee meant either “day” or “something done during the day,” such as work or travel. Middle English borrowed journee as journey in both senses, but only the sense “a day’s travel” survived into modern usage. In modern English, journey now refers to a trip without regard to the amount of time it takes. The verb journey developed from the noun and is first attested in the 14th century.

Examples of journey in a Sentence

Noun a long journey across the country She's on the last leg of a six-month journey through Europe. We wished her a safe and pleasant journey. Verb She was the first woman to journey into space. an intense yearning to journey to distant lands
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Join the internet on a dissonant journey through the origin story of the cashew below. Ashley Hoffman, Time, "People Are Still Trying to Come to Terms With How Cashews Grow Thanks to a World-Shattering Picture," 12 Sep. 2019 The songwriter and guitarist known as Michigander has been on a roller-coaster journey these last two years that has involved signing to a label (C3 Records), getting help from managers and publicists, and reaching an ever-growing audience. Jeff Milo, Detroit Free Press, "With his career heating up, singer-songwriter Michigander playing EP-release show Friday," 11 Sep. 2019 Days 1-4: Marrakech, Morocco Our journey begins in Marrakech at Djemaa el Fna, the city’s central square. National Geographic, "Morocco Community Service: Cultural Preservation," 10 Sep. 2019 Each person’s journey is unique, and each day I am moved by their stories and their bravery. Amy Stulman, Quartz, "Going to the doctor can be a traumatic experience for trans patients—but one piece of paper would help change that," 10 Sep. 2019 Still, nothing beats a little comfort on a long journey, as evidenced by Irina Shayk, who touched down at the JFK airport in New York today wearing no-fuss sweats. Vogue, "Irina Shayk Finds the Most Relatable Airport Style Hack," 29 Aug. 2019 Williams’s journey begins with a promise of immediate drama, thanks to a quirky draw that pits here against Maria Sharapova in a first-round match Monday night. Tara Sullivan, BostonGlobe.com, "Here’s hoping tennis superstars continue their dominance at US Open," 25 Aug. 2019 The boys will spy on the teen couple next door, but the drone gets snagged, and the nightmare journey has just begun. Ramona Sentinel, "Flickers: ‘Angel Has Fallen’ and ‘Overcomer’ open Friday," 20 Aug. 2019 His college journey began at UNLV, before detouring off to Fort Scott Community College. Richard Obert, azcentral, "Spencer Rattler, Brock Purdy, among former Arizona high school QBs in Division I football," 16 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Sarah has journeyed across the globe to create films that spotlight the work of National Geographic grantees, from translocating leopards in Namibia to unearthing mummies in Peru. National Geographic, "Sarah Joseph," 15 Sep. 2019 Teenage Sarah journeys through a maze to recover her baby brother from a goblin king. Los Angeles Times, "Movies on TV this week Sept. 15, 2019: ‘Alien,’ ‘Aliens’ and more," 13 Sep. 2019 At the time, there were some popular women travel authors, such as Isabella Frances Romer and Lady Hester Stanhope, who journeyed with their husbands or male escorts. Kate Siber, Outside Online, "Meet the World's First Solo Female Travel Writer," 24 July 2019 In the finale, the chef journeys to the rugged Alaskan Panhandle to learn survival skills and discover local cuisine. Lauren Huff, EW.com, "Gordon Ramsay rock climbs in a snowstorm in exclusive clip for Uncharted season finale," 22 Aug. 2019 Back in the year 630 CE, when the first hajj was made, pilgrims journeyed for months to reach Mecca, many by camel. chicagotribune.com, "Everything in Mecca gets 5 stars — and online reviews of other holy sites are wildly inflated, too," 20 Aug. 2019 Male tarantulas can journey up to a mile, Padilla said. Dylan Miettinen, CNN, "Is that love in the air? Thousands of tarantulas to descend on southeast Colorado in search of mates," 9 Aug. 2019 Roughly two dozen small balloons carrying radars that can track vehicles will journey over Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Missouri before ending up in Illinois, the Guardian. Lisa Kaczke, USA TODAY, "Pentagon launching drug surveillance balloons over Midwest," 2 Aug. 2019 After a brief return to Königsberg, Gisela journeyed to Lithuania following the promise of greater opportunity. Gail Fletcher, National Geographic, "The forgotten ‘wolf children’ of World War II," 29 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'journey.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of journey

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for journey

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French jurnee day, day's journey, from jur day, from Late Latin diurnum, from Latin, neuter of diurnus — see journal entry 1

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Statistics for journey

Last Updated

26 Oct 2019

Time Traveler for journey

The first known use of journey was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for journey

journey

noun
How to pronounce journey (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of journey

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an act of traveling from one place to another

journey

verb

English Language Learners Definition of journey (Entry 2 of 2)

: to go on a journey

journey

noun
jour·​ney | \ ˈjər-nē How to pronounce journey (audio) \
plural journeys

Kids Definition of journey

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an act of traveling from one place to another

journey

verb
journeyed; journeying

Kids Definition of journey (Entry 2 of 2)

: to travel to a distant place

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More from Merriam-Webster on journey

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for journey

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with journey

Spanish Central: Translation of journey

Nglish: Translation of journey for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of journey for Arabic Speakers

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