jargon

noun
jar·​gon | \ ˈjär-gən How to pronounce jargon (audio) , -ˌgän \

Definition of jargon

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group sports jargon
2 : obscure and often pretentious language marked by circumlocutions and long words an academic essay filled with jargon
3a : confused unintelligible language
b : a strange, outlandish, or barbarous language or dialect
c : a hybrid language or dialect simplified in vocabulary and grammar and used for communication between peoples of different speech

jargon

verb
jargoned; jargoning; jargons

Definition of jargon (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from jargon

Noun

jargony \ ˈjär-​gə-​nē How to pronounce jargony (audio) , -​ˌgä-​nē \ adjective

Examples of jargon in a Sentence

Noun medical jargon that the layman cannot understand an academic essay filled with jargon Verb the birds who began jargoning to greet the dawn
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The men referred to themselves as a QRF – military jargon for Quick Reaction Force. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, "Trump glorifies drivers who swarmed Biden bus in Texas, as others see harassment and felony assault," 2 Nov. 2020 But a small number of very rich people—ultra-high-net-worth individuals, in the jargon of private offices and estate agents—are living the Italian dream while paying what, for them, are modest taxes. The Economist, "Rich pickings A flat-tax scheme is luring the wealthy to Italy," 31 Oct. 2020 People also do this in an effort to portray their highly esteemed intellect—this is when heavy jargon and polysyllabic alternatives to concise declarative expressions appear. Harry Guinness, Popular Science, "Become a better writer with these online tools," 20 Oct. 2020 To help clarify voting in 2020, CBS News spoke to New Mexico's Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver about need-to-know Election Day jargon. Caitlin Conant, CBS News, "GOP state politicians call on Big Ten commissioner to allow football season," 8 Sep. 2020 Behind the jargon, though, is a serious issue — 2020 is a year that has deeply affected opera, calling into question its continuing relevance in an era riven by racial division, political upheaval and the merciless impact of the coronavirus. Terry Blain Special To The Star Tribune, Star Tribune, "Can opera still have an impact? That's literally this Minnesotan's job," 13 Oct. 2020 Growing giant pumpkins is a world onto itself, with its own jargon, legends, rumors, superstars, even endorsement deals, a book of rules and a governing body. Christopher Borrelli, chicagotribune.com, "A dedicated cult of growers look to grow the biggest giant pumpkin in Illinois, aiming for 2,000 pounds. And the winner is ...," 2 Oct. 2020 That includes deciphering financial jargon in PDF documents, analyzing that data, and then using it to fill in information in spreadsheets, which is helpful for cataloging invoices, among other tasks. Jonathan Vanian, Fortune, "The pandemic is speeding up automation, putting jobs in question," 11 Aug. 2020 Meanwhile, those who do study grammar have walled themselves off from everybody else by creating an impenetrable jargon. Bryan A. Garner, National Review, "A New Socratic Dialogue: Part 1 of 3," 3 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb That’s like the same thing that happened in 2008 when everybody was bedazzled by all these Wall Street jargon terms like collateralized debt obligations. Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Corey Pein, author of ‘Live Work Work Work Die,’ on Recode Decode," 13 June 2018 That’s like the same thing that happened in 2008 when everybody was bedazzled by all these Wall Street jargon terms like collateralized debt obligations. Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Corey Pein, author of ‘Live Work Work Work Die,’ on Recode Decode," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jargon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jargon

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for jargon

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French jargun, gargon

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Time Traveler for jargon

Time Traveler

The first known use of jargon was in the 14th century

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Statistics for jargon

Last Updated

12 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Jargon.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jargon. Accessed 28 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for jargon

jargon

noun
How to pronounce jargon (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of jargon

usually disapproving : the language used for a particular activity or by a particular group of people

jargon

noun
jar·​gon | \ ˈjär-gən How to pronounce jargon (audio) , -ˌgän \

Kids Definition of jargon

1 : the special vocabulary of an activity or group sports jargon
2 : language that is not clear and is full of long words

jargon

noun
jar·​gon | \ ˈjär-gən, -ˌgän How to pronounce jargon (audio) \

Medical Definition of jargon

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity, group, profession, or field of study medical jargon
2 : unintelligible, meaningless, or incoherent speech (as that associated with Wernicke's aphasia or some forms of schizophrenia)

More from Merriam-Webster on jargon

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for jargon

Nglish: Translation of jargon for Spanish Speakers

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