jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ ˈjär-gən , -ˌgän \

Definition of jargon 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity or group sports jargon

2 : obscure and often pretentious language marked by circumlocutions and long words an academic essay filled with jargon

3a : confused unintelligible language

b : a strange, outlandish, or barbarous language or dialect

c : a hybrid language or dialect simplified in vocabulary and grammar and used for communication between peoples of different speech

jargon

verb
jargoned; jargoning; jargons

Definition of jargon (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other words from jargon

Noun

jargony \ˈjär-gə-nē, -ˌgä-nē \ adjective

Examples of jargon in a Sentence

Noun

medical jargon that the layman cannot understand an academic essay filled with jargon

Verb

the birds who began jargoning to greet the dawn
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

This novel is filled with smart insights into aging parents, female friendships, tricky family dynamics and failing marriages, while too easily lapsing into women’s magazine jargon (enough with the Sandwich Generation). Alex Witchel, New York Times, "Allison Pearson ‘Does It’ Again," 1 June 2018 Brown gives Ortiz a talk on race strategy, with detailed jargon that the uninitiated can only loosely translate as: Let another horse challenge Justify at the start to tire him out, then grind it out to the finish. Kalyn Kahler, SI.com, "A Saturday at the Belmont With Gronk," 11 June 2018 In financial jargon, risk premia are being repriced. Richard Barley, WSJ, "Global Markets: A New, More Difficult Stage," 4 June 2018 Viewers learn alongside her: At first, the jargon her coworkers use sounds like a foreign language. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Stephanie Danler and Ella Purnell Talk 'Sweetbitter' and Strange Female Friendships," 10 June 2018 Suddenly, from the far reaches of my mind, the legal jargon jettisons to the surface. Whitney Ellenby, Washington Post, "Bystanders were horrified. But my son has autism, and I was desperate.," 27 Feb. 2018 Putting a jargon-laden lid on aggressive behavior pretty much guarantees that the lid is eventually going to blow. Ben Brantley, New York Times, "Review: A Master Class in Passive Aggression in ‘Miles for Mary’," 22 Jan. 2018 Free of geopolitical jargon, her deceptively simple prose is sprinkled with shrewd observations about the emotions that underpin bad or wicked political decisions. The Economist, "Madeleine Albright’s guide to fascism, past and present," 12 Apr. 2018 Through military jargon and agency insight, Clancy’s detail-heavy narratives sold a lot of books and, starting with the release of Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six in 1998, a lot of video games too. Mo Mozuch, Newsweek, "How to (Virtually) Survive in Post-Apocalypse Manhattan," 23 Feb. 2016

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That’s like the same thing that happened in 2008 when everybody was bedazzled by all these Wall Street jargon terms like collateralized debt obligations. Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Corey Pein, author of ‘Live Work Work Work Die,’ on Recode Decode," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jargon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jargon

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for jargon

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French jargun, gargon

Verb

see jargon entry 1

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Statistics for jargon

Last Updated

20 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for jargon

The first known use of jargon was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for jargon

jargon

noun

English Language Learners Definition of jargon

: the language used for a particular activity or by a particular group of people

jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ ˈjär-gən , -ˌgän \

Kids Definition of jargon

1 : the special vocabulary of an activity or group sports jargon

2 : language that is not clear and is full of long words

jargon

noun
jar·gon | \ ˈjär-gən, -ˌgän \

Medical Definition of jargon 

1 : the technical terminology or characteristic idiom of a special activity, group, profession, or field of study medical jargon

2 : unintelligible, meaningless, or incoherent speech (as that associated with Wernicke's aphasia or some forms of schizophrenia)

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Comments on jargon

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