irrefragable

adjective

ir·​re·​fra·​ga·​ble i-ˈre-frə-gə-bəl How to pronounce irrefragable (audio)
ˌi(r)-;
ˌir-i-ˈfra-gə-
1
: impossible to refute
irrefragable arguments
2
: impossible to break or alter
irrefragable rules
irrefragability
i-ˌre-frə-gə-ˈbi-lə-tē How to pronounce irrefragable (audio)
ˌi(r)-;
ˌir-i-ˌfra-gə-
noun
irrefragably
i-ˈre-frə-gə-blē How to pronounce irrefragable (audio)
ˌi(r)-;
ˌir-i-ˈfra-gə-
adverb

Did you know?

Since at least 1533, irrefragable has been used as an English adjective modifying things (such as arguments or data) that are impossible to refute. It derives from the Late Latin adjective irrefragabilis (of approximately the same meaning), which is itself derived from the Latin verb refragari, meaning "to oppose or resist." Irrefragable rather quickly developed a second sense referring to things (such as rules, laws, and even objects) that cannot be broken or changed. There was once also a third sense that applied to inflexible or obstinate people.

Examples of irrefragable in a Sentence

the prosecutor painstakingly built an irrefragable case

Word History

Etymology

Late Latin irrefragabilis, from Latin in- + refragari to oppose, from re- + -fragari (as in suffragari to vote for); akin to Latin suffragium suffrage

First Known Use

1533, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of irrefragable was in 1533

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Dictionary Entries Near irrefragable

Cite this Entry

“Irrefragable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irrefragable. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

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