intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \

Definition of intrepid

: characterized by resolute fearlessness, fortitude, and endurance an intrepid explorer

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Other Words from intrepid

intrepidity \ ˌin-​trə-​ˈpi-​də-​tē How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \ noun
intrepidly \ in-​ˈtre-​pəd-​lē How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \ adverb
intrepidness noun

Don't Be Afraid to Learn About Intrepid

You need not be afraid to find out the origins of today’s word, although its history does include fear. Intrepid derives from the Latin word intrepidus, itself formed by the combination of the prefix in- (meaning "not") and trepidus, meaning "alarmed." Other relatives of "trepidus" in English include "trepidation" and "trepidatious," as well as "trepid" (which actually predates "intrepid" and means "fearful") and even the rare "trepidity" (a synonym for "trepidation" in the sense of "fear, apprehension"). Synonyms for "intrepid" include "courageous," "valiant," "fearless," "valorous," and simply "brave."

Examples of intrepid in a Sentence

The heroes are intrepid small-business owners, investigative reporters, plaintiffs and their lawyers, and, of course, Nader himself and his grass-roots organizations. — Jonathan Chait, New York Times Book Review, 3 Feb. 2008 Author and explorer Dame Freya Stark was one of the most intrepid adventurers of all time. (T. E. Lawrence, no slouch in the travel department himself, called her "gallant" and "remarkable.") — Kimberly Robinson, Travel & Leisure, December 1999 Meanwhile, the intrepid Florentine traveler Marco Polo had been to China and brought back with him a noodle dish that became Italian pasta … — Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1993 an intrepid explorer who probed parts of the rain forest never previously attempted
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Recent Examples on the Web The death at age 90 of Michael Collins, command-module pilot for Apollo 11, is the loss of a friend, an unswerving patriot and an intrepid explorer. Buzz Aldrin, WSJ, "To the Moon and Back With Michael Collins, 1930-2021," 30 Apr. 2021 Overall, the Egyptologists come across as an intense, impressive, often disagreeable bunch: intrepid and eccentric, stubborn and domineering, xenophobic and self-serving. Ursula Lindsey, The New York Review of Books, "Ancient Egypt for the Egyptians," 27 Apr. 2021 The girls are intrepid, have courage, and thrive on adventure. Carol Dyhouse, Time, "What the Rise and Fall of the Cinderella Fairy Tale Means for Real Women Today," 19 Apr. 2021 But Matsuyama hunted down his wayward opening drive in the left woods and decisively chose an intrepid course, smashing his ball from a bed of wispy pine straw through a slender gap between two trees. New York Times, "Hideki Matsuyama Wins the Masters With a Groundbreaking Performance," 11 Apr. 2021 Think of such exclusive wines as rewards for intrepid loyalists and wine adventurers willing to go beyond retail. Elin Mccoy, Fortune, "The posh bottles of wine so exclusive that you can’t just go out and buy," 10 Apr. 2021 Spirt of the North has been in operation since 1994, helping intrepid vacationers check off a must-do bucket list adventure. Wendy Altschuler, Forbes, "Top Things To Do In Big Sky, Montana Right Now," 10 Apr. 2021 Ever since, we have been left to wonder whether these two intrepid explorers might have stood on top that day, nearly three decades before the official first ascent by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in May of 1953. Mark Synnott, Wired, "Here’s What It Takes to Fly a Drone on Mount Everest," 13 Apr. 2021 In addition, policies, financing and other incentives need to be put in place by local and possibly national governments to encourage the acceptance of vehicles like the EN-V by people other than a small group of intrepid early adopters. Larry Greenemeier, Scientific American, "Wired Wheels: Taking a Spin in the Future of Urban Transportation," 13 Jan. 2011

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intrepid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intrepid

1680, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intrepid

Latin intrepidus, from in- + trepidus alarmed — more at trepidation

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Time Traveler for intrepid

Time Traveler

The first known use of intrepid was in 1680

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Last Updated

7 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Intrepid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intrepid. Accessed 11 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for intrepid

intrepid

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of intrepid

literary + often humorous : feeling no fear : very bold or brave

intrepid

adjective
in·​trep·​id | \ in-ˈtre-pəd How to pronounce intrepid (audio) \

Kids Definition of intrepid

: feeling no fear : bold

Comments on intrepid

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