inordinate

adjective
in·​or·​di·​nate | \ in-ˈȯr-də-nət How to pronounce inordinate (audio) , -ˈȯrd-nət \

Definition of inordinate

1 : exceeding reasonable limits : immoderate
2 archaic : disorderly, unregulated

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Other Words from inordinate

inordinately adverb
inordinateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for inordinate

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

Did You Know?

At one time if something was "inordinate," it did not conform to the expected or desired order of things. That sense, synonymous with "disorderly" or "unregulated," is now archaic, but it offers a hint at the origins of "inordinate." The word traces back to the Latin verb ordinare, meaning "to arrange," combined with the negative prefix in-. "Ordinare" is also the ancestor of such English words as "coordination," "subordinate," "ordination," and "ordain." "Ordinare" did not give us "order," "orderly," or "disorderly," but the root of those words is the same Latin noun ("ordo") from which "ordinare" itself derives.

Examples of inordinate in a Sentence

I waited an inordinate amount of time. They have had an inordinate number of problems with the schedule.
Recent Examples on the Web Starting in March, an inordinate number of us were looking for a new hobby to stay busy with, to lavish our sudden abundance of free time and attention on — and to keep our minds off the strange illness striking people down all over the world. Jennifer Bolton, Houston Chronicle, "Houston's rare plant business is blooming because of the pandemic," 13 Oct. 2020 Democrats maintain a hefty edge over Republicans in terms of voter registration, with 90,000, but Republicans point to the inordinate amount of independent voters in the state as evidence that the state remains up for grabs. Joseph Simonson, Washington Examiner, "Biden on defense in Nevada," 7 Oct. 2020 Perhaps to find that rhythm, the Cardinals threw an inordinate number of sideways passes last Sunday. Kent Somers, The Arizona Republic, "Why there's hope for the Arizona Cardinals dink and sink passing game over the next month," 7 Oct. 2020 There’s school, proms, parents, parties, gossip and the inordinate amount of general anxiety that comes with being a teenager in the 21st Century. Seth Combs Writer, San Diego Union-Tribune, "In Marisa Reichardt’s ‘Aftershocks,’ little problems, and one big one," 3 Oct. 2020 The founders of the Permanent Fund Dividend program saw a system where those who were politically connected got an inordinate share of our resource wealth and instead wanted to ensure every Alaskan got a share of our oil wealth. Anchorage Daily News, "Candidate Q&A: Alaska Senate District H — Bill Wielechowski," 3 Oct. 2020 The show is slated to hit the airwaves in the final stretch of a fierce presidential campaign unlike any other, a race that supplies an inordinate number of comedic possibilities. NBC News, "'Saturday Night Live' is back. The show could feel very different.," 3 Oct. 2020 Paucity of pass-catchers: The 49ers have had an inordinate amount of early season injuries. Eric Branch, SFChronicle.com, "49ers’ Garoppolo still out; Eagles’ pass-catching corps decimated," 1 Oct. 2020 Building these behemoth experiments consumes inordinate amounts of time and money, so researchers have been looking for alternative ways to probe for new physics. Daniel Garisto, Scientific American, "Possibility of Dark Bosons Entices Physicists," 30 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inordinate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inordinate

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for inordinate

Middle English inordinat, from Latin inordinatus, from in- + ordinatus, past participle of ordinare to arrange — more at ordain

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Time Traveler for inordinate

Time Traveler

The first known use of inordinate was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

21 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Inordinate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inordinate. Accessed 28 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for inordinate

inordinate

adjective
How to pronounce inordinate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of inordinate

: going beyond what is usual, normal, or proper

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