inculcate

verb
in·cul·cate | \ in-ˈkəl-ˌkāt , ˈin-(ˌ) \
inculcated; inculcating

Definition of inculcate 

transitive verb

: to teach and impress by frequent repetitions or admonitions

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Other words from inculcate

inculcation \ˌin-(ˌ)kəl-ˈkā-shən \ noun
inculcator \in-ˈkəl-ˌkā-tər, ˈin-(ˌ)kəl- \ noun

Synonyms for inculcate

Synonyms

endue (or indue), imbue, infuse, ingrain (also engrain), inoculate, invest, steep, suffuse

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Choose the Right Synonym for inculcate

implant, inculcate, instill, inseminate, infix mean to introduce into the mind. implant implies teaching that makes for permanence of what is taught. implanted a love of reading in her students inculcate implies persistent or repeated efforts to impress on the mind. tried to inculcate in him high moral standards instill stresses gradual, gentle imparting of knowledge over a long period of time. instill traditional values in your children inseminate applies to a sowing of ideas in many minds so that they spread through a class or nation. inseminated an unquestioning faith in technology infix stresses firmly inculcating a habit of thought. infixed a chronic cynicism

Did You Know?

Inculcate derives from the past participle of the Latin verb inculcare, meaning "to tread on." In Latin, "inculcare" possesses both literal and figurative meanings, referring to either the act of walking over something or to that of impressing something upon the mind, often by way of steady repetition. It is the figurative sense that survives with "inculcate," which was first used in English in the 16th century. "Inculcare" was formed in Latin by combining the prefix in- with calcare, meaning "to trample," and ultimately derives from the noun calx, meaning "heel." In normal usage "inculcate" is typically followed by the prepositions "in" or "into," with the object of the preposition being the person or thing receiving the instruction.

Examples of inculcate in a Sentence

The teacher inculcated in her students the importance of good study habits. dedicated teachers inculcating young minds with a love of learning

Recent Examples on the Web

If democratic systems inculcate pro-democratic values in their citizens, as political scientists generally believe, then these countries should show higher support for democracy than autocratic countries. Christopher Claassen, Washington Post, "Support for democracy is declining — but not in the U.S. or other Western democracies," 5 July 2018 While its foreign policy has enabled it to generate an impressive base of national power, Beijing has been unable to inculcate a distinct vision within a network of alliances. Ali Wyne, The New Republic, "Is America Choosing Decline?," 21 June 2018 Some behaviors have just kinda inculcated themselves into the collective unconsciousness. Lee Hutchinson, Ars Technica, "Video: We force kids to confront ’80s technology," 24 Apr. 2018 The generals created an educational system that inculcated bigotry in generations of schoolchildren. Shashank Bengali, latimes.com, "In Myanmar, hatred for Rohingya Muslims runs so deep that a diplomat called them 'ugly as ogres' — and got promoted," 26 Dec. 2017 White nationalist organizations regard colleges as spaces where millions of young Americans, without their intervention, will be inculcated with the ideas of valuing diversity, seeking and creating inclusion and equity, the investigators found. Janell Ross, Washington Post, "‘It’s okay to be white’ signs and stickers appear on campuses and streets across the country," 3 Nov. 2017 The fight against fake news will hinge not on inculcating trust in specific sources of authority but on instilling skepticism, curiosity, and a sense of agency among consumers, who are the best bulwark against the merchants of deceit. chicagotribune.com, "The Pro-Free Speech Way to Fight Fake News," 12 Oct. 2017 America’s messianic missions in Iraq and Afghanistan hadn’t gone well, and Obama was too young to have been inculcated with the logic of the Cold War. Sophie Pinkham, New Republic, "Understanding Russia’s War Stories," 26 Sep. 2017 Which is exactly the impression Kim wants to inculcate, and why, after his visit in 2014, the young despot ordered a full refurbishment of the Sinchon museum. Charlie Campbell / Beijing, Time, "President Trump’s U.N. Speech Is Exactly What Kim Jong Un Wanted to Hear," 20 Sep. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inculcate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inculcate

1539, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for inculcate

Latin inculcatus, past participle of inculcare, literally, to tread on, from in- + calcare to trample, from calc-, calx heel

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Time Traveler for inculcate

The first known use of inculcate was in 1539

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More Definitions for inculcate

inculcate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of inculcate

: to cause (something) to be learned by (someone) by repeating it again and again

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