incontinent

adjective
in·​con·​ti·​nent | \ (ˌ)in-ˈkän-tə-nənt How to pronounce incontinent (audio) \

Definition of incontinent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: not continent: such as
a : unable to voluntarily control retention of urine or feces in the body
b(1) : lacking self-restraint
(2) : not being under control

incontinent

adverb

Definition of incontinent (Entry 2 of 2)

Examples of incontinent in a Sentence

Adjective special products for incontinent patients
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective By her early 30s, the after-effects of the radiation had damaged her colon to the point where Burgess-Stocks became incontinent. Colleen Murphy, Health.com, 29 Nov. 2021 In rapidly aging Japan, more diapers are used by older, incontinent people than by babies. New York Times, 15 Nov. 2021 Karreon had autism and was developmentally disabled, incontinent, non-verbal and partially blind, according to a search warrant affidavit filed in Clark County Superior Court. oregonlive, 28 May 2021 Karreon was autistic, developmentally disabled, incontinent, non-verbal and partially blind, according to the affidavit. oregonlive, 14 Apr. 2021 Listen at one point or another, many of us have dated a gross guy who is verbally incontinent and causes a wildfire fight amongst lady friends. Roxanne Adamiyatt, Town & Country, 26 Sep. 2020 Nonskid rugs are great in homes with golden-age dogs that may become incontinent because of kidney disease or as a side effect of heart medication, to name just a couple of potential causes. Kim Campbell Thornton Andrews Mcmeel, Star Tribune, 28 Aug. 2020 Already incontinent, now Benton couldn’t walk or lift himself out of a chair or bed. Jessica Ravitz, ajc, 25 Apr. 2020 Over a period of days, this patient, who had heart disease, diabetes and moderate cognitive impairment, stopped walking and became incontinent and profoundly lethargic. Judith Graham, CNN, 23 Apr. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'incontinent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of incontinent

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Adverb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for incontinent

Adjective

Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin incontinent-, incontinens, from in- + continent-, continens continent

Adverb

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin in continenti

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Time Traveler for incontinent

Time Traveler

The first known use of incontinent was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near incontinent

incontinency

incontinent

incontinently

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Cite this Entry

“Incontinent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/incontinent. Accessed 20 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for incontinent

incontinent

adjective
in·​con·​ti·​nent | \ (ˈ)in-ˈkänt-ᵊn-ənt How to pronounce incontinent (audio) \

Medical Definition of incontinent

: not continent especially : unable to retain a bodily discharge (as urine) voluntarily

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