imprudent

adjective
im·​pru·​dent | \ (ˌ)im-ˈprü-dᵊnt How to pronounce imprudent (audio) \

Definition of imprudent

: not prudent : lacking discretion, wisdom, or good judgment an imprudent investor

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from imprudent

imprudently adverb

Examples of imprudent in a Sentence

It's politically imprudent to stir up such controversy during an election year. a very sweet girl, but so imprudent that no one trusts her with a secret
Recent Examples on the Web Such rules are an imprudent use of taxpayer dollars and reduce growth by making inputs such as iron and steel more expensive. Adam A. Millsap, Forbes, 25 May 2021 Republicans are using the numbers to argue that big spending on pandemic relief, along with additional spending on infrastructure, which the administration proposes paying for largely with tax increases, would be imprudent. New York Times, 10 June 2021 On Tuesday, Andria Heese, 29, the Columbia officer who had originally been charged with involuntary manslaughter in the 2019 death of Gabriella Curry, pleaded guilty to a reduced charge of careless and imprudent driving, KRCG, KOMU and ABC17 report. Kc Baker, PEOPLE.com, 2 June 2021 Wait — all that about prudent and imprudent choices in regard to the pandemic is irrelevant. Washington Post, 30 Mar. 2021 Betting that Beyond Meat would ever achieve market share so much greater than the largest companies in the meat business is imprudent for fiduciaries and risky, to say the least. David Trainer, Forbes, 1 Mar. 2021 Development requires balance: a city must attract investment, but imprudent development can harm its character. Evan Casey, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 21 Jan. 2020 That observation leads to this report’s second big claim: when a sophisticated citizenry aspires to democracy, frustrating that aspiration can be imprudent as well as unjust. The Economist, 5 Dec. 2019 And while an overt assault on Pope John Paul II was understood to be imprudent, even among the feminist ideologues in the East Wing, there were other means of registering displeasure. George Weigel, National Review, 18 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'imprudent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of imprudent

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for imprudent

Middle English, from Latin imprudent-, imprudens, from in- + prudent-, prudens prudent

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About imprudent

Time Traveler for imprudent

Time Traveler

The first known use of imprudent was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near imprudent

improviso

imprudence

imprudency

imprudent

impsonite

impt

imptr

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for imprudent

Last Updated

7 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Imprudent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/imprudent. Accessed 24 Jul. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for imprudent

imprudent

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of imprudent

formal : not wise or sensible : not prudent

More from Merriam-Webster on imprudent

Nglish: Translation of imprudent for Spanish Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Spelling Words Quiz

  • alphabet pasta spelling help
  • Which is the correct spelling?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!