hypocrisy

noun
hy·​poc·​ri·​sy | \ hi-ˈpä-krə-sē also hī- \
plural hypocrisies

Definition of hypocrisy

1 : a feigning to be what one is not or to believe what one does not : behavior that contradicts what one claims to believe or feel His hypocrisy was finally revealed with the publication of his private letters. especially : the false assumption of an appearance of virtue or religion our conventional morality often serves as a cover for hypocrisy and selfishness — Lucius Garvin
2 : an act or instance of hypocrisy a keen awareness of one's parents' hypocrisies

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Examples of hypocrisy in a Sentence

When his private letters were made public, they revealed his hypocrisy. the hypocrisy of people who say one thing but do another Teenagers often have a keen awareness of their parents' hypocrisies.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The resulting hypocrisy and meanness are on display at every turn. Paula Marantz Cohen, WSJ, "Kant in Kindergarten Could Ease the Civility Crisis," 28 Dec. 2018 In a fiery dissent joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sotomayor calls out the hypocrisy and cruelty of the Supreme Court ruling, using Trump’s own words. Anne Branigin, The Root, "Sonia Sotomayor Reads the Supreme Court's Travel Ban Decision for Filth," 26 June 2018 Since when do secrets and hypocrisy and stigma ever teach children the right lessons? Robin Abrahams, BostonGlobe.com, "Miss Conduct’s common sense rules for socializing in the age of legal pot," 19 June 2018 Readers of Ms Cusk’s novel, a daring bonfire of hypocrisies and emotions, will not be wasting theirs. The Economist, "Rachel Cusk experiments with new ways to tell stories," 10 May 2018 That background provided the foundation for his journalism, which skewers hypocrisy and greed in both political parties. Bob Sims, AL.com, "AL.com's John Archibald wins 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary," 16 Apr. 2018 You were supposed to feel the sudden wind-shear of hypocrisy. Lance Morrow, WSJ, "A Spectral Witness Materializes," 17 Sep. 2018 This is why Donald Trump’s objection to Bee’s language not only smacks of hypocrisy, but also makes no sense. Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic, "What’s So Bad About the C-Word?," 5 June 2018 During Arsene Wenger's swansong against Burnley, the hypocrisy in the air was rife. SI.com, "Emery Social Media Response Underlines Why Arsenal Fans Have Become the Worst in Football," 22 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hypocrisy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hypocrisy

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for hypocrisy

Middle English ypocrisye, borrowed from Anglo-French ypocrisie, borrowed from Late Latin hypocrisis, ypocrisis, borrowed from Greek hypókrisis "playing a part on the stage, pretending to be something one is not," from hypokri-, variant stem of hypokrī́nomai, hypokrī́nesthai "to reply, make an answer, speak in dialogue, play a part on the stage, feign" (from hypo- hypo- + krī́nomai, middle voice of krī́nō, krī́nein "to separate, choose, decide, judge") + -sis, suffix forming nouns of action or process — more at certain entry 1

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More Definitions for hypocrisy

hypocrisy

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hypocrisy

disapproving : the behavior of people who do things that they tell other people not to do : behavior that does not agree with what someone claims to believe or feel

hypocrisy

noun
hy·​poc·​ri·​sy | \ hi-ˈpä-krə-sē \
plural hypocrisies

Kids Definition of hypocrisy

: the quality of acting in a way that goes against claimed beliefs or feelings

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