harp

noun
\ ˈhärp How to pronounce harp (audio) \

Definition of harp

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a plucked stringed instrument consisting of a resonator, an arched or angled neck that may be supported by a post, and strings of graded length that are perpendicular to the soundboard
2 : something resembling a harp

harp

verb
harped; harping; harps

Definition of harp (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to play on a harp
2 : to dwell on or recur to a subject tiresomely or monotonously usually used with on

Illustration of harp

Illustration of harp

Noun

harp 1

In the meaning defined above

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Other Words from harp

Noun

harpist \ ˈhär-​pist How to pronounce harp (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for harp

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of harp in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun And that's my problem: when people kind of harp on other people that are good at something. Marie Claire, 14 June 2021 The room also has a back door, so an orchestra can move its harp and cellos to the Main Stage without cutting through the lobby. Sean P. Means, The Salt Lake Tribune, 26 May 2021 Written for harp, flute and bassoon, its mystical mood was enhanced by unusual demands for the instrumentalists. Rob Hubbard, Star Tribune, 17 Apr. 2021 Some mariachi bands have harps, and Mariachi Rubor is looking for a harp player. Shanti Lerner, The Arizona Republic, 21 May 2021 Composed by Thomas Cabaniss and Saskia Lane, with a libretto by Zoë Palmer, this work celebrates color with soaring vocals and Riza Printup’s harp. New York Times, 20 May 2021 His Serenade #10 (1957), for flute and harp, comprises eight brief movements running about 12 minutes. Tim Diovanni, Dallas News, 21 Apr. 2021 Renié was a revolutionary force in the world of harp at the turn of the 20th century in France. Tim Diovanni, Dallas News, 23 Apr. 2021 Their radiant – the point in the sky from which the Lyrids appear to come from – is the constellation Lyra, the harp, particularly the star Vega, the brightest star in the constellation. Leada Gore | Lgore@al.com, al, 21 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Williams and his staff are likely to harp long and loud about that in the days to come. Kent Somers, The Arizona Republic, 15 June 2021 No need to harp on accuracy for a sci-fi crime noir story set in the year 2071! Jenny Singer, Glamour, 8 June 2021 Opponents have more time to construct specific game plans to take away strengths and harp on weaknesses, which makes versatility and flexibility paramount. Bryan Toporek, Forbes, 18 May 2021 So Faulconer may continue to harp on the school reopenings, especially if Republicans continue to feel that way. Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, 2 May 2021 Ads in these states will harp on one theme: A Biden administration will not tolerate looting. Joseph Simonson, Washington Examiner, 2 Sep. 2020 But Trail Blazers coach Terry Stotts didn’t wish to harp on Gabriel’s penchant for having referees blow whistles in his direction. oregonlive, 19 Aug. 2020 Because there are so many dependent risk factors that are different for each family, all experts agree that parents need to harp on the basics. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, 22 July 2020 The piece opens with agitated flourishes in the guitar and harp that build to a sudden exclamation. Tim Diovanni, Dallas News, 22 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'harp.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of harp

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for harp

Noun

Middle English harpe, going back to Old English hearpe (feminine weak noun), going back to Germanic *harpōn- (whence also Old Saxon harpa "harp, rack, gridiron for torture" Old High German harpha, harfa "harp, gridiron for torture," Old Norse harpa "harp"), of uncertain origin

Note: As a source for Middle English harpe compare also Anglo-French and continental Old French harpe, borrowed from Germanic. The sixth-century poet and hymnodist Venantius Fortunatus, resident at the Merovingian court, attests the word in Latin: "Romanusque lyra plaudat tibi, barbarus harpa …" ("Let the Roman applaud you with the lyre, the barbarian with the harp …").

Verb

Middle English harpen "to play a harp, pluck" (also harpen on "repeat [something] constantly"), going back to Old English hearpian "to play the harp," derivative of hearpe harp entry 1

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Time Traveler for harp

Time Traveler

The first known use of harp was before the 12th century

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Statistics for harp

Last Updated

22 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Harp.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/harp. Accessed 23 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for harp

harp

noun

English Language Learners Definition of harp

: a musical instrument that has strings stretched across a large open frame and that is played with your fingers

harp

noun
\ ˈhärp How to pronounce harp (audio) \

Kids Definition of harp

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a musical instrument consisting of a triangular frame set with strings that are plucked by the fingers

harp

verb
harped; harping

Kids Definition of harp (Entry 2 of 2)

: to call attention to something over and over again The teacher harped on her mistake.

More from Merriam-Webster on harp

Nglish: Translation of harp for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of harp for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about harp

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