hall

noun
\ ˈhȯl \

Definition of hall

 (Entry 1 of 7)

1a : the castle or house of a medieval king or noble
b : the chief living room in such a structure
2 : the manor house of a landed proprietor
3 : a large usually imposing building for public or semipublic purposes
4a(1) : a building used by a college or university for some special purpose
(2) : dormitory
b : a college or a division of a college at some universities
c(1) : the common dining room of an English college
(2) : a meal served there
5a : the entrance room of a building : lobby
b : a corridor or passage in a building
6 : a large room for assembly : auditorium
7 : a place used for public entertainment

Hall

biographical name (1)
\ ˈhȯl \

Definition of Hall (Entry 2 of 7)

Charles Francis 1821–1871 American arctic explorer

Hall

biographical name (2)

Definition of Hall (Entry 3 of 7)

Charles Martin 1863–1914 American chemist and manufacturer

Hall

biographical name (3)

Definition of Hall (Entry 4 of 7)

G(ranville) Stanley 1844–1924 American psychologist and educator

Hall

biographical name (4)

Definition of Hall (Entry 5 of 7)

James Norman 1887–1951 American novelist

Hall

biographical name (5)

Definition of Hall (Entry 6 of 7)

Jeffrey C(onnor) 1945–     American biologist

Hall

biographical name (6)

Definition of Hall (Entry 7 of 7)

John L(ewis) 1934–     American physicist

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Examples of hall in a Sentence

Noun

The bathroom is down the hall. Her office is at the end of the hall. I'll meet you in the front hall. The front door opens onto a large hall. We rented a hall for the wedding reception.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Lagerfeld's sketches for the lobby imagine an impressive entrance hall in metallic shades and accents, flanked by photographs of his own making and gleaming columns and chandeliers. Erik Maza, Town & Country, "Karl Lagerfeld Turns Interior Designer With a New Miami Masterpiece," 3 Jan. 2019 Meanwhile the halls at the Capitol are nearly dead silent, with congressional leaders barely pretending to try to reopen the departments of Justice, Interior and Homeland Security and other agencies that remain unfunded. Amanda Sakuma, Vox, "Trump threatens to shut down the border for the third time in three months," 29 Dec. 2018 As a child Holley would wander the halls of her mother’s offices, unimpressed. Jessica Chou, Glamour, "Shawn Holley Will Free You Now," 11 Dec. 2018 At freewheeling town-hall meetings, O’Rourke espouses gun control, single-payer health care, and other progressive positions, sprinkling his speeches with folksy anecdotes and occasional profanity. Andrew Rice, Daily Intelligencer, "Can a Democrat Ever Win in Texas?," 10 July 2018 Mackey made the comments Wednesday at a companywide town-hall meeting with Whole Foods employees, some of whom have been chafing under new management style since Amazon bought the grocery chain last year. Kevin Kelleher, Fortune, "Whole Foods CEO Says He's Not Afraid to 'Speak Truth' to Jeff Bezos," 14 June 2018 The man in Freedom of Speech was a neighbor of Rockwell’s, shown getting up at a town-hall meeting. Wayne Lawson, Vanities, "Norman Rockwell’s Hokey America Is Looking Pretty Good Right Now," 30 May 2018 To sway skeptical residents and community leaders, for months the JWPC held town-hall meetings with community leaders, the business community, teachers, university students, and average citizens. Taylor Luck, The Christian Science Monitor, "In rural Jordan, pulling power from the wind to make change on the ground," 3 May 2018 Often referred to as the father of modern medicine, Osler insisted that students learn from seeing and talking to patients rather than being confined to lecture halls. Maude Campbell, Popular Mechanics, "The Complete History of the Autopsy," 26 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hall.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hall

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for hall

Noun

Middle English halle, from Old English heall; akin to Old High German halla hall, Latin cella small room, celare to conceal — more at hell

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Statistics for hall

Last Updated

16 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hall

The first known use of hall was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for hall

hall

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hall

: a usually long, narrow passage inside a building with doors that lead to rooms on the sides

: the area inside the entrance of a building

: a large room or building for meetings, entertainment, etc.

hall

noun
\ ˈhȯl \

Kids Definition of hall

1 : a passage in a building that leads to rooms : corridor
2 : an entrance room
4 : a large building used for public purposes city hall
5 : a building or large room set apart for a special purpose a dining hall

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More from Merriam-Webster on hall

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with hall

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hall

Spanish Central: Translation of hall

Nglish: Translation of hall for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hall for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about hall

Comments on hall

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