grenade

noun
gre·​nade | \ grə-ˈnād How to pronounce grenade (audio) \

Definition of grenade

: a small missile that contains an explosive or a chemical agent (such as tear gas, a flame producer, or a smoke producer) and that is thrown by hand or projected (as by a rifle or special launcher)

Examples of grenade in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Then there are grenades, food, and water, a poncho, and liner, plus personal items such as a flashlight, night vision gear, and medical kit. David Hambling, Popular Mechanics, "The Overloaded Soldier: Why U.S. Infantry Now Carry More Weight Than Ever," 26 Dec. 2018 Bullets are limited, as are smoke grenades, EMP bombs, hit points, and armor. Steven Strom, Ars Technica, "Never Stop Sneakin’ is a brilliant send-up of ’90s stealth games," 12 July 2018 As the choppers hovered over the muddy clearing, heavily armed police, bristling with grenades, body armor and automatic rifles, rushed at the machine. Jim Wyss And Kyra Gurney, miamiherald, "Dirty gold is the new cocaine in Colombia — and it’s just as bloody," 16 Jan. 2018 The drama continued as Trump headed to his next stop, the U.K. His first official visit was overshadowed by fallout from the rhetorical grenade he’d lobbed at British Prime Minister Theresa May before arriving. Jill Colvin, The Seattle Times, "Tumult of Trump’s Europe trip smashes presidential precedent," 17 July 2018 Officials said the prime minister was sitting on the stage among other officials when the grenade exploded. Hadra Ahmed, New York Times, "Deadly Grenade Attack at Ethiopian Prime Minister’s Rally," 23 June 2018 The stun grenades detonate, producing a concussive blast of 180 decibels. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Bill Clinton and James Patterson’s Concussive Collaboration," 3 June 2018 A hundred Air Force members walked the six mile stretch of gravel road where the grenades are thought to have been lost, but didn't find them. Lily Hay Newman, WIRED, "Security News This Week: California Charges Owners of Mugshots.com With Extortion," 19 May 2018 The timer is configurable and precise, eliminating the variability of existing grenades. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "Rectangular, Computerized Grenade Puts a New Spin on the Flashbang," 28 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grenade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of grenade

1591, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for grenade

Middle French, literally, pomegranate, from Late Latin granata, from Latin, feminine of granatus seedy, from granum grain — more at corn

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Statistics for grenade

Last Updated

10 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for grenade

The first known use of grenade was in 1591

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More Definitions for grenade

grenade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of grenade

: a small bomb that is designed to be thrown by someone or shot from a rifle

grenade

noun
gre·​nade | \ grə-ˈnād How to pronounce grenade (audio) \

Kids Definition of grenade

: a small bomb designed to be thrown by hand or fired (as by a rifle)

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More from Merriam-Webster on grenade

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with grenade

Spanish Central: Translation of grenade

Nglish: Translation of grenade for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of grenade for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about grenade

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