front-page

1 of 2

adjective

: printed on the front page of a newspaper
also : very newsworthy

front-page

2 of 2

verb

front-paged; front-paging; front-pages

transitive verb

: to print or report on the front page

Examples of front-page in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
The product was a front-page article on March 17, 2008, that traced personal animosity between Tupac and the rap artist known as Biggie Smalls, or Notorious B.I.G., to a 1994 ambush at a New York recording studio at which Tupac had been robbed and pistol-whipped. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 6 Feb. 2024 When the documents turned out to be forged, the paper printed a front-page retraction, and Philips was pressured into resigning. Chris Willman, Variety, 1 Feb. 2024 Your front-page article regarding the writings of Martin Luther King starkly illustrates how the anti-diversity movement uses the idea of color blindness to mask their intentions to reverse decades of civil rights successes and ongoing diversity and equity efforts. Letters To The Editor, The Mercury News, 18 Jan. 2024 After the turmoil of the past few years, why would anyone worth the job want the job? Jan. 18, 2 pm PST Updated to reflect Carolyn Ryan’s role at The New York Times and that a front-page report referenced was on Oct. 9 not Oct. 8. Jason McGahan, The Hollywood Reporter, 18 Jan. 2024 So, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new treatment for Alzheimer’s in July, the event made front-page news. Kenneth Miller, Discover Magazine, 12 Dec. 2023 The idea seemed so novel that Ronald Reagan’s promise during his 1980 presidential campaign made front-page news. Linda Greenhouse, New York Times, 1 Dec. 2023 Sanatan Sanstha denied any involvement, but a day later the group’s newsletter ran a front-page statement calling Dabholkar’s death a blessing. Parth M.n., WIRED, 23 Nov. 2023 In January 2019, Sánchez and Bezos themselves made front-page news when their love affair was made public in a National Enquirer imbroglio, prompting Bezos to post a call to arms decrying the tabloid. Chloe Malle, Vogue, 13 Nov. 2023
Verb
And that would lead to a front-page story about the then-Karen Farmer in the Dec. 28, 1977, edition of the New York Times. Scott Talley, Freep.com, 19 Mar. 2023 In November of that year, a front-page New York Times article was instrumental in bringing awareness of deep learning technology to the broader public sphere. IEEE Spectrum, 14 Mar. 2023 On Thursday, so many years later, Japan got itself more front-page baseball news. Stephen Wade, The Christian Science Monitor, 10 Mar. 2023 The Padres certainly have become an everyday story this spring, but three front-page-worthy headlines on the same day? Bryce Millercolumnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, 28 Feb. 2023 On July 14, 1944, The Washington Post published a front-page article about the event. Emily Langer, Washington Post, 28 Feb. 2023 Her first front-page story from Japan was about the middle-aged dissolution of a beloved boy band. Claire Moses, New York Times, 19 Feb. 2023 Whitaker notes that later that summer, Carmichael attracted the attention of President Lyndon Johnson after a New York Times front-page story linked him to another SNCC organizer’s anti-White sentiments. Washington Post, 16 Feb. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'front-page.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Adjective

1917, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1929, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of front-page was in 1917

Dictionary Entries Near front-page

Cite this Entry

“Front-page.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/front-page. Accessed 22 Feb. 2024.

More from Merriam-Webster on front-page

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!