freedom

noun
free·​dom | \ ˈfrē-dəm How to pronounce freedom (audio) \

Definition of freedom

1 : the quality or state of being free: such as
a : the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or action
b : liberation from slavery or restraint or from the power of another : independence
c : the quality or state of being exempt or released usually from something onerous freedom from care
d : unrestricted use gave him the freedom of their home
e : ease, facility spoke the language with freedom
f : the quality of being frank, open, or outspoken answered with freedom
g : improper familiarity
h : boldness of conception or execution
2a : a political right

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Choose the Right Synonym for freedom

freedom, liberty, license mean the power or condition of acting without compulsion. freedom has a broad range of application from total absence of restraint to merely a sense of not being unduly hampered or frustrated. freedom of the press liberty suggests release from former restraint or compulsion. the released prisoner had difficulty adjusting to his new liberty license implies freedom specially granted or conceded and may connote an abuse of freedom. freedom without responsibility may degenerate into license

Examples of freedom in a Sentence

Or Bugs would do the impossible by jumping out of the frame and landing on the drawing board of the cartoonist who was at work creating him. This freedom to transcend the laws of basic physics, to hop around in time and space, and to skip from one dimension to another has long been a crucial aspect of imaginative poetry. — Billy Collins, Wall Street Journal, 28-29 June 2008 I can see that my choices were never truly mine alone—and that that is how it should be, that to assert otherwise is to chase after a sorry sort of freedom. — Barack Obama, Dreams from My Father, (1995) 2004 It's the beginning of summer.  … For many adults who are really closet kids, this means that their blood hums with a hint of freedom — Anna Quindlen, Newsweek, 18 June 2001 He thinks children these days have too much freedom. She has the freedom to do as she likes. a political prisoner struggling to win his freedom
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Recent Examples on the Web Beyond this, the civil rights and Black freedom movements called attention to the persistence of racial segregation and hierarchy throughout the postwar period in both the North and the South. Kim Phillips-fein, The New Republic, 2 Aug. 2021 Vaccine requirements raise different legal questions and are less worrisome to some groups concerned with religious freedom because there is often the opportunity to get an exemption based on religious beliefs. CNN, 2 Aug. 2021 Her mother rocked Rosa in her arms as the Berlin Wall crumbled and the promise of freedom vibrated amongst Cubans inside and outside the island. Vanessa Garcia, National Review, 1 Aug. 2021 Her struggles have inspired a #FreeBritney movement among her fans, who have petitioned and fought for the pop star's freedom. Andrea Towers, EW.com, 30 July 2021 York demanded freedom as a reward for his services on the expedition, Historian Stephn Ambrose wrote. CBS News, 29 July 2021 York demanded freedom as a reward for his services on the expedition, Historian Stephen Ambrose wrote. NBC News, 29 July 2021 Hmong people are an ethnic group who lived in southwestern China but migrated to Laos and Thailand seeking more freedom. Gabriela Miranda, USA TODAY, 29 July 2021 But even so, for many people, phones felt like freedom — and like the future. refinery29.com, 28 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'freedom.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of freedom

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for freedom

see free entry 1

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Learn More About freedom

Time Traveler for freedom

Time Traveler

The first known use of freedom was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near freedom

freedman

freedom

freedom fighter

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Statistics for freedom

Last Updated

4 Aug 2021

Cite this Entry

“Freedom.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/freedom. Accessed 4 Aug. 2021.

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More Definitions for freedom

freedom

noun

English Language Learners Definition of freedom

: the power to do what you want to do : the ability to move or act freely
: the state of not being a slave, prisoner, etc.
: the state of not having or being affected by something unpleasant, painful, or unwanted

freedom

noun
free·​dom | \ ˈfrē-dəm How to pronounce freedom (audio) \

Kids Definition of freedom

1 : the condition of having liberty The slaves won their freedom.
2 : ability to move or act as desired freedom of choice
3 : release from something unpleasant freedom from care
4 : the quality of being very frank : candor spoke with freedom
5 : a political right freedom of speech

freedom

noun
free·​dom

Legal Definition of freedom

1 : the quality or state of being free: as
a : the absence of necessity, coercion, or constraint in choice or action
b : liberation from slavery or restraint or from the power of another
c : the quality or state of being exempt or released from something onerous
2a : a political or civil right

More from Merriam-Webster on freedom

Nglish: Translation of freedom for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of freedom for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about freedom

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