freedman

noun
freed·​man | \ ˈfrēd-mən How to pronounce freedman (audio) , -ˌman \

Definition of freedman

: a person freed from slavery

Examples of freedman in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Having first modeled an idealized, kneeling figure from his own white body, Ball was persuaded to rework the pose based on a photograph of an actual freedman named Archer Alexander. Jonathan W. White, Smithsonian Magazine, "What Frederick Douglass Had to Say About Monuments," 30 June 2020 When plantation heirs tried to reclaim the land, freedmen forcefully resisted. Daniel R. Mandell, Time, "How the Civil War Changed the Way Americans Thought About Economic Inequality," 7 Apr. 2020 The historically black school had been established for the education of freedmen at the end of the Civil War. Los Angeles Times, "Commentary: Remembering the man whose landmark 1976 exhibition insisted: Black art matters," 7 Apr. 2020 Unfortunately, freedmen were disappointed as federal officials moved reluctantly to enforce Johnson’s policies. Daniel R. Mandell, Time, "How the Civil War Changed the Way Americans Thought About Economic Inequality," 7 Apr. 2020 According to the Texas State Historical Association online, two instances of violence against the Wilsons in 1867 may have led to the creation of their freedman’s town outside Seguin. Vincent T. Davis, ExpressNews.com, "Conservationists and descendants explore forgotten San Antonio African American cemetery," 12 Jan. 2020 Republican coalitions, during any period of the party’s success, have always included some groups that were plainly outsiders: black freedmen in the 1870s, Mormons in the Progressive era, Cuban refugees in the 1980s. Dan Mclaughlin, National Review, "Our Two-Party System Isn’t Going Anywhere," 25 Nov. 2019 The community, founded as a freedman’s town in 1871, is rich in history. Jane Stueckemann, Houston Chronicle, "Children’s Books on Wheels still serving Tamina community after 15 years," 2 Aug. 2019 Demobilized Union officer Comfort Servosse’s fearless support for civil rights and the education of freedmen triggers hostility from his new white neighbors in the South. Charles Lane, WSJ, "Five Best: Charles Lane on Reconstruction and Its Consequences," 12 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'freedman.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of freedman

1587, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of freedman was in 1587

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Cite this Entry

“Freedman.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/freedman. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for freedman

freedman

noun
freed·​man | \ ˈfrēd-mən How to pronounce freedman (audio) \
plural freedmen\ -​mən \

Kids Definition of freedman

: a person freed from slavery

More from Merriam-Webster on freedman

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for freedman

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about freedman

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