fiction

noun
fic·​tion | \ ˈfik-shən How to pronounce fiction (audio) \

Definition of fiction

1a : something invented by the imagination or feigned specifically : an invented story … I'd found out that the story of the ailing son was pure fiction. — Andrew A. Rooney
b : fictitious literature (such as novels or short stories) was renowned as a writer of fiction
c : a work of fiction especially : novel Her latest work is a fiction set during the Civil War.
2a : an assumption of a possibility as a fact irrespective of the question of its truth a legal fiction
b : a useful illusion or pretense it was only a fiction of independence his mother gave him; he was almost totally under her power— G. A. Wagner
3 : the action of feigning or of creating with the imagination She engaged in fiction to escape painful realities.

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Other Words from fiction

fictional \ ˈfik-​shnəl How to pronounce fictional (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective
fictionality \ ˌfik-​shə-​ˈna-​lə-​tē How to pronounce fictionality (audio) \ noun
fictionally \ ˈfik-​shnə-​lē How to pronounce fictionally (audio) , -​shə-​nᵊl-​ē \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for fiction

Synonyms

fable, fabrication, fantasy (also phantasy), figment, invention

Antonyms

fact, materiality, reality

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Examples of fiction in a Sentence

She believes the fiction that crime rates are up. most stories about famous outlaws of the Old West are fictions that have little or nothing to do with fact

Recent Examples on the Web

For a long time, taking her students to a book launch in the Bronx seemed like its own speculative fiction. Anne Branigin, Teen Vogue, "The Lit Bar Is the Bronx's New Bookstore Putting the Community First," 27 Mar. 2019 But reading between the lines of her fiction might, in the end, provide the most revealing glance into her private life. Kate Storey, Town & Country, "Who Will Get the First MacKenzie Bezos Interview?," 10 Jan. 2019 If Lippmann had his way, the public would be liberated from its oppressive fictions, but at the price of everything just about democracy. Sean Illing, Vox, "Intellectuals have said democracy is failing for a century. They were wrong.," 20 Dec. 2018 Like Serial, In The Dark, or your other non-fiction audio thriller of choice, information reveals itself incrementally to constantly change the scope of the central case and your understanding of it. Nathan Mattise, Ars Technica, "The Guilty review: Even in 2018, a simple phone can be utterly thrilling," 21 Oct. 2018 Celebrated as a pyrotechnic writer of short fiction, screenplays, comic books and criticism, Mr Ellison was as prodigious a source of anecdote, vendetta and litigation. The Economist, "Harlan Ellison died on June 27th," 5 July 2018 But then, Wardle said during a recent visit to San Francisco, a young producer, Grace Hughes-Hallett, brought to his attention a true life-is-stranger-than-fiction story from the 1980s that cut right through his skepticism in an instant. Jessica Zack, SFChronicle.com, "‘Three Identical Strangers’ a strange case of triplets separated at birth and then reunited," 26 June 2018 Stephenson may not end up in a part-time gig at a medical lab, but maybe—like the epigenetics of Seveneves—the science could end up part of his fiction. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "How Neal Stephenson Got Book Ideas by Moonlighting at Blue Origin," 19 June 2018 The ceremony was held in honor of high school seniors who submitted non-fiction stories centered around New York City. Mike Miller, PEOPLE.com, "Robert De Niro Tells High School Students Trump Is Spreading 'Bulls---': Report," 7 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fiction.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fiction

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for fiction

Middle English ficcioun "invention of the mind," borrowed from Middle French fiction, borrowed from Latin fictiōn-, fictiō "action of shaping or molding, feigning, pretense, legal fiction," from fig-, variant stem of fingere "to mold, fashion, make a likeness of, pretend to be" + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action — more at feign

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Statistics for fiction

Last Updated

15 Apr 2019

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Time Traveler for fiction

The first known use of fiction was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for fiction

fiction

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fiction

: written stories about people and events that are not real : literature that tells stories which are imagined by the writer
: something that is not true

fiction

noun
fic·​tion | \ ˈfik-shən How to pronounce fiction (audio) \

Kids Definition of fiction

1 : something told or written that is not fact
2 : a made-up story
3 : works of literature that are not true stories

fiction

noun
fic·​tion

Legal Definition of fiction

Other Words from fiction

fictional adjective

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Comments on fiction

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