expulsion

noun
ex·​pul·​sion | \ ik-ˈspəl-shən How to pronounce expulsion (audio) \

Definition of expulsion

: the act of expelling : the state of being expelled

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from expulsion

expulsive \ ik-​ˈspəl-​siv How to pronounce expulsion (audio) \ adjective

Examples of expulsion in a Sentence

The government engaged in mass expulsions. the expulsion of air from the lungs
Recent Examples on the Web Students of color continue to be overrepresented in the annual expulsion and suspension rates of school districts — and the lawsuit contends that the state education leaders have failed to address that disparity. Matt Hamilton, Los Angeles Times, 8 Oct. 2021 The expulsion orders — which gave U.N. leaders 72 hours to leave the country — followed the United States in September threatening sanctions if Ethiopia’s government did not take steps to end the 10-month conflict in Tigray. Washington Post, 1 Oct. 2021 The council had already scheduled closed-door consultations late Friday morning on the expulsion order. BostonGlobe.com, 1 Oct. 2021 Require more robust data collection on suspension and expulsion trends. Andrew Pulrang, Forbes, 30 Sep. 2021 Most of the officials named in Thursday’s expulsion order work for the U.N.’s Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, whose detailed reports have been instrumental in bringing global attention to the crisis in Tigray. New York Times, 30 Sep. 2021 The district’s suspension rate for the 2018-19 school year was more than 8 percent, about two-thirds higher than the statewide rate for high school students, and the expulsion rate for the district was nearly 45 percent higher than the state’s. Bethany Mollenkof, ProPublica, 29 Sep. 2021 An estimated 8,000 returned to Mexico voluntarily, while another 4,000 remain in U.S. custody awaiting expulsion or release. Camilo Montoya-galvez, CBS News, 27 Sep. 2021 The app’s expulsion was widely denounced by opposition politicians. Michael Liedtke And Barbara Ortutay, Anchorage Daily News, 22 Sep. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'expulsion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of expulsion

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for expulsion

Middle English, from Anglo-French expulsioun, from Latin expulsion-, expulsio, from expellere to expel

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About expulsion

Time Traveler for expulsion

Time Traveler

The first known use of expulsion was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near expulsion

expulse

expulsion

expulsion fuse

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for expulsion

Last Updated

15 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Expulsion.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/expulsion. Accessed 22 Oct. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon
Seen & Heard
People are talking about

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for expulsion

expulsion

noun

English Language Learners Definition of expulsion

: the act of forcing someone to leave a place (such as a country or a school) : the act of expelling someone
: the act of forcing something out : the act of expelling something

expulsion

noun
ex·​pul·​sion | \ ik-ˈspəl-shən How to pronounce expulsion (audio) \

Kids Definition of expulsion

: the act of forcing to leave : the state of being forced to leave

More from Merriam-Webster on expulsion

Nglish: Translation of expulsion for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of expulsion for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Spelling Words Quiz

  • alphabet pasta spelling help
  • Which is the correct spelling?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!