exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Definition of exorbitant

1 : not coming within the scope of the law
2 : exceeding the customary or appropriate limits in intensity, quality, amount, or size

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Other Words from exorbitant

exorbitantly adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for exorbitant

excessive, immoderate, inordinate, extravagant, exorbitant, extreme mean going beyond a normal limit. excessive implies an amount or degree too great to be reasonable or acceptable. excessive punishment immoderate implies lack of desirable or necessary restraint. immoderate spending inordinate implies an exceeding of the limits dictated by reason or good judgment. inordinate pride extravagant implies an indifference to restraints imposed by truth, prudence, or good taste. extravagant claims for the product exorbitant implies a departure from accepted standards regarding amount or degree. exorbitant prices extreme may imply an approach to the farthest limit possible or conceivable but commonly means only to a notably high degree. extreme shyness

How Was exorbitant First Used?

The first use of "exorbitant" in English was "wandering or deviating from the normal or ordinary course." That sense is now archaic, but it provides a hint as to the origins of "exorbitant": the word derives from Late Latin exorbitans, the present participle of the verb exorbitare, meaning "to deviate." "Exorbitare" in turn was formed by combining the prefix ex-, meaning "out of," with the noun orbita, meaning "track of a wheel or "rut." ("Orbita" itself traces back to "orbis," the Latin word for "disk" or "hoop.") In the 15th century "exorbitant" came to refer to something which fell outside of the normal or intended scope of the law. Eventually, it developed an extended sense as a synonym of "excessive."

Examples of exorbitant in a Sentence

The citizens of Xiaoli Village move lazily, with a languor born of chronic underemployment. They are farmers by tradition, but exorbitant taxes have leached any profitability out of their profession. — Hannah Beech, Time, 27 Oct. 2003 As with the black truffle, foie gras is as exorbitant ($52 a pound) as it is decadent (one gram of foie gras can reportedly be 900 calories). — Heather Morgan, Traveler, April 2000 … I recommend that the Congress adopt … [a] continuation of the law for the renegotiation of war contracts—which will prevent exorbitant profits and assure fair prices to the Government. — Franklin D. Roosevelt 11 Jan. 1944, in Nothing to Fear by B. D. Zevin1946 They were charged exorbitant rates for phone calls. the cost of our stay was so exorbitant you would have thought that we had bought the hotel and not just spent a few nights there
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Recent Examples on the Web

The film, rescued from Paramount after that studio had nixed it a month before shooting was set to begin, ended up costing Netflix an exorbitant $115 million. Isaac Feldberg, BostonGlobe.com, "Ben Affleck’s ‘Triple Frontier’ flop is reportedly making Netflix more budget-conscious," 7 July 2019 By 2017, some exporters were paying exorbitant sums for poor quality beans. The Economist, "The murky world of Madagascar’s roaring vanilla trade," 5 July 2019 Chief among those are the state’s exorbitant property taxes, which often provide the lone funding for local school districts. John Hirschauer, National Review, "New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy Abandons the ‘Millionaires Tax’," 1 July 2019 That July, the salary cap spiked because of an influx of TV money, and dozens of exorbitant contracts were doled out. Mike Singer, The Denver Post, "Nuggets narrow focus to several key positions in free agency," 30 June 2019 That’s looking to change, though, as this year, there are a number of new laptops on the market with OLED screen options and without exorbitant markups. Dan Seifert, The Verge, "OLED laptops are an idea whose time has come," 27 June 2019 Then came Bill de Blasio, who savaged O’Rourke for promising to protect private insurance, with its sometimes exorbitant deductibles and premiums. Dara Lind, Vox, "4 winners and 3 losers from the first night of the Democratic debates," 27 June 2019 State officials say they’re making progress in expanding community treatment, but the federal government is making exorbitant demands that exceed its authority. USA TODAY, "Troll trail, coal train derailment, geyser record: News from around our 50 states," 27 June 2019 Advocates say the legislation would prevent unscrupulous lenders from charging vulnerable Californians exorbitant rates, which can exceed 200%, on loans. Maloy Moore, latimes.com, "California trails in regulating short-term lenders. This bill could finally rein them in," 25 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exorbitant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exorbitant

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exorbitant

Middle English, from Late Latin exorbitant-, exorbitans, present participle of exorbitare to deviate, from Latin ex- + orbita track of a wheel, rut, from orbis disk, hoop

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Statistics for exorbitant

Last Updated

11 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for exorbitant

The first known use of exorbitant was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for exorbitant

exorbitant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of exorbitant

: going far beyond what is fair, reasonable, or expected : too high, expensive, etc.

exorbitant

adjective
ex·​or·​bi·​tant | \ ig-ˈzȯr-bə-tənt How to pronounce exorbitant (audio) \

Kids Definition of exorbitant

: more than what is fair, reasonable, or expected exorbitant prices

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