excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) , ek- \
excited; exciting

Definition of excite

transitive verb

1a : to call to activity
b : to rouse to an emotional response scenes to excite the hardest man to pity
c : to arouse (something, such as a strong emotional response) by appropriate stimuli excite enthusiasm for the new regime— Arthur Knight
2a : energize excite an electromagnet
b : to produce a magnetic field in excite a dynamo
3 : to increase the activity of (something, such as a living organism) : stimulate
4 : to raise (an atomic nucleus, an atom, a molecule, etc.) to a higher energy level

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Choose the Right Synonym for excite

provoke, excite, stimulate, pique, quicken mean to arouse as if by pricking. provoke directs attention to the response called forth. my stories usually provoke laughter excite implies a stirring up or moving profoundly. news that excited anger and frustration stimulate suggests a rousing out of lethargy, quiescence, or indifference. stimulating conversation pique suggests stimulating by mild irritation or challenge. that remark piqued my interest quicken implies beneficially stimulating and making active or lively. the high salary quickened her desire to have the job

Examples of excite in a Sentence

ideas that excite young people Our announcement excited the children. The posters excited much interest in the show.
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Recent Examples on the Web The rallies Trump enjoys were more than just a way to excite his core supporters. Gregory Korte, Bloomberg.com, "Trump Campaign Bets on Approval Rating Boost at Mercy of Virus," 15 May 2020 Avoid poetry, dramatic representations (except Comedy), Music, serious novels, melancholy sentimental people, and every thing likely to excite feeling or emotion not ending in active benevolence. — 13th. Verlyn Klinkenborg, The New York Review of Books, "An English Clergyman’s Advice For Quarantine," 14 May 2020 Matt Barreto, co-founder of the Democratic-aligned polling firm Latino Decisions, noted that Sanders, who like Biden is a white man in his late 70s, was able to excite Latino voters not because of his race but because of his progressive positions. Will Weissert And Nicholas Riccardi, azcentral, "Biden’s VP pick isn’t the biggest issue for Latino activists," 13 May 2020 There are plenty of reasons to be excited about the way the Longhorns’ roster is shaping up. Alex Briseno, Dallas News, "5 reasons for optimism about Texas football in 2020: Longhorns finally field an experienced defense," 5 May 2020 According to 247Sports West regional analyst Blair Angulo, who watched Thompson in person this spring, the Arizona product is one that should have fans excited about the future. oregonlive, "Updated rankings: Oregon Ducks QB Ty Thompson, WR Kyron Ware-Hudson among nation’s biggest risers," 12 May 2020 One of the biggest things that’s exciting about the concept of an MMO is going into an unexplored, undiscovered world. Cecilia D'anastasio, Wired, "How World of Warcraft Has Evolved With the Internet," 7 May 2020 The kids were excited to see her, said Leyva, who lost custody of her children in February. Arizona Republic, "Parents of foster children lose what that keeps them connected: In-person visits," 29 Apr. 2020 Heading into a re-election battle, presidents always need to ensure their most loyal supporters are excited about the prospect of showing up to vote on Election Day. Damon Linker, TheWeek, "Trump's immigration order is toxic xenophobia. It's also smart politics.," 21 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'excite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of excite

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for excite

Middle English, from Anglo-French exciter, from Latin excitare, from ex- + citare to rouse — more at cite

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Time Traveler for excite

Time Traveler

The first known use of excite was in the 14th century

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Statistics for excite

Last Updated

30 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Excite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/excite. Accessed 7 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for excite

excite

verb
How to pronounce excite (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of excite

: to cause feelings of enthusiasm in (someone) : to make (someone) feel energetic and eager to do something
: to cause (a particular emotion or reaction) to be felt or to happen
: to increase the activity of (something, such as nerve tissue)

excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Kids Definition of excite

1 : to stir up feeling in The announcement excited the children.
2 : to increase the activity of This chemical excites nerve cells.
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Medical Definition of excite

1 : to increase the activity of (as a living organism) : stimulate
2 : to raise (as an atomic nucleus, an atom, or a molecule) to a higher energy level

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More from Merriam-Webster on excite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for excite

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with excite

Spanish Central: Translation of excite

Nglish: Translation of excite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of excite for Arabic Speakers

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