excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) , ek-\
excited; exciting

Definition of excite

transitive verb

1a : to call to activity
b : to rouse to an emotional response scenes to excite the hardest man to pity
c : to arouse (something, such as a strong emotional response) by appropriate stimuli excite enthusiasm for the new regime— Arthur Knight
2a : energize excite an electromagnet
b : to produce a magnetic field in excite a dynamo
3 : to increase the activity of (something, such as a living organism) : stimulate
4 : to raise (an atomic nucleus, an atom, a molecule, etc.) to a higher energy level

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Choose the Right Synonym for excite

provoke, excite, stimulate, pique, quicken mean to arouse as if by pricking. provoke directs attention to the response called forth. my stories usually provoke laughter excite implies a stirring up or moving profoundly. news that excited anger and frustration stimulate suggests a rousing out of lethargy, quiescence, or indifference. stimulating conversation pique suggests stimulating by mild irritation or challenge. that remark piqued my interest quicken implies beneficially stimulating and making active or lively. the high salary quickened her desire to have the job

Examples of excite in a Sentence

ideas that excite young people Our announcement excited the children. The posters excited much interest in the show.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The online reactions are the perfect storm of excited, nervous, and immediately critical. Aamina Khan, Teen Vogue, "Ramy Youssef Wants to "Complicate the Conversation" with His New Hulu Series," 19 Apr. 2019 Adventure is a huge turn-on for these fiery lovers, but nothing excites Sagittarius Venus more than a good sense of humor. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "What the Position of Venus in Your Birth Chart Means for You," 31 July 2018 The thick lasers excite sodium atoms in the high atmosphere, revealing the amount of turbulence in the air. Jay Bennett, Popular Mechanics, "New Technology Allows Ground Telescope to Take Sharper Images Than Hubble," 18 July 2018 Barrett has excited social conservatives since she was questioned about her Roman Catholic faith in her nomination hearings last year, but her brief time on the bench has raised questions. Washington Post, "Trump still pondering Supreme Court pick as big reveal nears," 8 July 2018 The idea may not excite folks, especially those who like to cook in their garages or who bring the grill over to the edge of the garage or carport when the rain starts to fall. Christina Hall, Detroit Free Press, "Grilling in the garage in Warren could soon land you in jail," 18 June 2018 The Mueller report may add tidbits about Donald Trump’s business or personal associates that excite a certain type of journalist: the kind who thinks that when one accusation against Mr. Trump has been debunked, the answer is to find another. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "Can the Media Survive Mueller?," 16 Apr. 2019 Under this dark and velvety sky, take time to consider what excites your spirit. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "What September's Sagittarius Horoscope Means for You," 30 Aug. 2018 Fasting is not the first dietary approach to excite researchers. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "Not So Fast," 24 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'excite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of excite

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for excite

Middle English, from Anglo-French exciter, from Latin excitare, from ex- + citare to rouse — more at cite

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Statistics for excite

Last Updated

17 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for excite

The first known use of excite was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for excite

excite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of excite

: to cause feelings of enthusiasm in (someone) : to make (someone) feel energetic and eager to do something
: to cause (a particular emotion or reaction) to be felt or to happen
: to increase the activity of (something, such as nerve tissue)

excite

verb
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Kids Definition of excite

1 : to stir up feeling in The announcement excited the children.
2 : to increase the activity of This chemical excites nerve cells.
ex·​cite | \ ik-ˈsīt How to pronounce excite (audio) \
excited; exciting

Medical Definition of excite

1 : to increase the activity of (as a living organism) : stimulate
2 : to raise (as an atomic nucleus, an atom, or a molecule) to a higher energy level

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More from Merriam-Webster on excite

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with excite

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for excite

Spanish Central: Translation of excite

Nglish: Translation of excite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of excite for Arabic Speakers

Comments on excite

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