escapism

noun

es·​cap·​ism i-ˈskā-ˌpi-zəm How to pronounce escapism (audio)
: habitual diversion of the mind to purely imaginative activity or entertainment as an escape from reality or routine
escapist adjective or noun

Examples of escapism in a Sentence

Reading romantic novels is for her a form of escapism.
Recent Examples on the Web In scenes that find the Höss family in repose on the banks of the Sola, sound creates a canopy of futile escapism — the woodpeckers echoing the machine guns, the turtledoves grieving in the trees, the unceasing wails of Hedwig’s baby Annagret. Michael Andor Brodeur, Washington Post, 28 Feb. 2024 All of them hark back to a rowdy, rough-and-tumble time when movies were content to be vessels of visceral wish fulfillment and mindless, instantly disposable escapism. Ann Hornaday, Washington Post, 22 Mar. 2024 Though the approach of spring and summer tend to inspire chops, the better to weather the temperature, consider the visual impact of hair left loose and wild—a sense of free-spirited escapism plays well with sunny days and long, balmy nights. Calin Van Paris, Vogue, 14 Mar. 2024 Speaking to a specific, rural, and Southern slice of Black American culture, the juke joint offers a world of escapism in a dark room. Korsha Wilson, Bon Appétit, 11 Mar. 2024 The mix of escapism, historicism, and overt femininity combined with nostalgia have made the coquette aesthetic one of the most viral trends of this 2024. Teresa Romero Martínez, Glamour, 24 Feb. 2024 The dominance of nonfiction cinema at this year’s edition, meanwhile, felt indicative of a restless mood in the industry, a reluctance to turn away from a world on fire to the comforts of escapism, as artists reckon with their platform and their privilege, and how best to use them. Guy Lodge, Variety, 24 Feb. 2024 Traveling to Escape Could be a Sign of Avoidance Traveling at a frenetic pace and leaning into the frenzy of visiting country after country could be a form of escapism disguised as exploring exotic vacations. Amiah Taylor, Discover Magazine, 15 Feb. 2024 After surviving a pandemic, inflation and environmental crises, many adults, particularly Gen Zers and millennials, appear to be leaning into a nostalgic form of escapism: play. Daysia Tolentino, NBC News, 2 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'escapism.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1933, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of escapism was in 1933

Dictionary Entries Near escapism

Cite this Entry

“Escapism.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/escapism. Accessed 18 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

escapism

noun
es·​cap·​ism is-ˈkā-ˌpiz-əm How to pronounce escapism (audio)
: a habit of thinking or a form of entertainment about purely imaginary or amusing things that provides an escape from reality or everyday matters
escapist adjective or noun

Medical Definition

escapism

noun
es·​cap·​ism is-ˈkā-ˌpiz-əm How to pronounce escapism (audio)
: habitual diversion of the mind to purely imaginative activity or entertainment as an escape from reality or routine
escapist adjective or noun

More from Merriam-Webster on escapism

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