escalator

noun
es·ca·la·tor | \ˈe-skə-ˌlā-tər, nonstandard -skyə- \

Definition of escalator 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a power-driven set of stairs arranged like an endless belt that ascend or descend continuously

b : an upward course suggestive of an escalator a never-stopping escalator of economic progress— D. W. Brogan

2 : an escalator clause or provision

escalator

adjective

Definition of escalator (Entry 2 of 2)

: providing for a periodic proportional upward or downward adjustment (as of prices or wages) an escalator arrangement tying the base pay … to living costsN. Y. Times

Examples of escalator in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In 1987, a catastrophic fire started on an escalator at the King’s Cross station, and thirty-one people died; a painstaking official inquiry into its causes revealed the depth of the neglect. William Finnegan, The New Yorker, "Can Andy Byford Save the Subways?," 2 July 2018 The first person to design an escalator was Nathan Ames. Matt Blitz, Popular Mechanics, "Movin' On Up: The Curious Birth and Rapid Rise of the Escalator," 6 Apr. 2016 Riding an escalator to the mezzanine of President Plaza, I was hypnotized by the performance of the chef behind the counter of the tiny O’Tray Noodles. Taras Grescoe, New York Times, "The Best Asian Food in North America? Try British Columbia," 4 June 2018 Shoppers use escalators and elevators to go between the floors. Paul Takahashi, Houston Chronicle, "Photos: H-E-B to open its first two-story grocery store in Houston," 26 June 2018 The escalator for the food court is right next to the sportsbook. Ed Barkowitz, Philly.com, "Comparing the sportsbooks at Atlantic City's Borgata and Ocean Resort ahead of the World Cup final," 11 July 2018 Strangers high-fived each other on subway escalators. Anatoly Kurmanaev, WSJ, "Moscow Celebrates After Surprise World Cup Win," 1 July 2018 Using handheld scanners, the inspectors who’d staked out the escalator checked the tickets and Clipper cards of each person. Michael Cabanatuan, San Francisco Chronicle, "BART cited 1,300 fare evaders in 2 months. Only about 100 paid up," 4 June 2018 The victim, 45, walked onto the escalator from the top floor of Providence Place Mall on Monday night, ABC 6 said. Crystal Hill, miamiherald, "Man was ‘clowning around’ on a mall escalator, witness says. He fell to his death.," 29 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'escalator.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of escalator

Noun

1900, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adjective

1930, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for escalator

Noun

from Escalator, a trademark

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Statistics for escalator

Last Updated

15 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for escalator

The first known use of escalator was in 1900

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More Definitions for escalator

escalator

noun

English Language Learners Definition of escalator

: a moving set of stairs that carries people up or down from one level of a building to another

escalator

noun
es·ca·la·tor | \ˈe-skə-ˌlā-tər \

Kids Definition of escalator

: a moving stairway for going from one level (as of a building) to another

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